Build a technical documentation page help please!

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      <header> <h1>Puppy Vaccinations</h1></header>
  
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      <section class="main-section" id="Introduction">   
        <header><h3>Introduction</header>
        <article>
          <p>
Dog vaccinations play a critical role in protecting your dog from many dangerous and even fatal diseases. While state law requires all dogs are vaccinated for rabies, there are a number of other vaccinations that can protect your dog from serious diseases that are easily preventable.
          </p></article>

      
      <hive><ul><div class="sidebar">
        <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Rabies">Rabies</a></li>
        <li><a class="nav-link" href="#DHPP">DHPP</a></li>
        <li>
          <a class="nav-link" href="#Leptospirosis"
            >Leptospirosis</a
          >
        </li>
        <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Lyme">Lyme</a></li>
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          <a class="nav-link" href="#Bordetella">Bordetella</a>
        </li>
        <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Influenza">Influenza</a></li>

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        <h3>Core vs. Non-core vaccines</h3>
        <article>
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            <p>
        Core puppy vaccinations and dog vaccinations are considered vital to all canines based on a universal risk of exposure, the severity of disease, and the risk of transmission to other dogs, as well as other animal species including human beings.  </p>
        <li>Rabies</li>
          <li>Distemper</li>  
      <p>Non-core vaccines are very important for most dogs who may be exposed to these infectious diseases. At your dog's next appointment, we will be happy to review which of the above make the most sense for your dog and make the appropriate recommendations.</p>

<li>Leptospirosis</li>
<li>Lyme</li>
<li>Bordetella</li>
<li>Influenza</li>
          </ul>
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      <section class="main-section" id="Rabies">
        <header><h4>Rabies</h4></header>
        <article>

          <p>
  Rabies vaccinations are required by law in most states, including NY. Owners must periodically have their dogs and puppies vaccinated against rabies, but the specific time frames for puppy vaccinations and dog vaccinations vary by state. In NY, puppy rabies vaccine is generally given between 12-16 weeks ( no earlier than week 12), and the rabies vaccination is good for one year. For adult dogs, the rabies vaccination is good for three years and should be addressed at the time of the first visit for new patients. For example, a puppy would receive the rabies vaccine at 16 weeks, 1 year and then again at age 4.          
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        </article>
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      <section class="main-section" id="DHPP">
        <header><h4>DHPP</h4></header>
<p>DHPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, Parvo)
The DHPP vaccination is commonly referred to as a distemper or a distemper-parvo vaccine. It does protect against those two potentially fatal viral infections, but it covers much more. Canine distemper is a contagious viral infection that attacks a dog’s respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological systems. The parvo virus mainly targets the gastrointestinal tract resulting in vomiting and bloody diarrhea. It also suppresses the patient’s immune system and unfortunately, can even affect the heart. The hepatitis virus most commonly damages the liver, but it can also affect the kidneys, spleen and/or lungs. The last component of this combination vaccine is the parainfluenza virus. This is a respiratory infection that is spread rapidly between dogs.
</p><p>
This is a core vaccination that is needed by all dogs. Without protection, dogs will die from these viral infections. Puppies can be started on this vaccine by 6 weeks of age. It is critical to vaccinate puppies on the appropriate time table. </p>
<p>Once a properly vaccinated puppy reaches adulthood, they should receive boosters every 1-3 years as determined by a veterinarian. Adult dogs whose vaccine status is unknown (stray, shelter obtained, etc) should receive a series of 2 vaccines, 2-4 weeks apart, to ensure that they are adequately immunized.
     </p> </section>
      <section class="main-section" id="Leptospirosis">
      <header><h4>Leptospirosis</h4></header>
        <p>
  Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that is spread through the urine of infected wildlife (including rodents), livestock or even other dogs. It is one of the most common zoonotic (spread from animals to humans) diseases world wide.  This means it can not only be fatal to your dog, but to you as well!</p>
  <p>  Typically a dog will show vague signs of disease such as fever, decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea and low energy levels. The most severe cases can result in kidney and/or liver failure.
        </p>
      </section>
      <section class="main-section" id="Lyme">
        <header><h4>Lyme</h4></header>
        <article>
<p>
       Lyme disease is transmitted to dogs through the bite of a tick. Once in the blood stream, the Lyme disease organism is carried to many parts of the body and is likely to localize in joints or kidneys. The most common type of tick to carry Lyme disease is the deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick). </p>
 <p> Many dogs affected with Lyme disease are taken to a veterinarian because they seem to be experiencing generalized pain and have stopped eating. Affected dogs have been described as if they were walking on eggshells. Often these pets have high fevers. Dogs may also begin limping. This painful lameness often appears suddenly and may shift from one leg to another. If untreated, it may eventually disappear, only to recur weeks or months later.</p>
<p>
Some pets are infected with the Lyme disease organism for over a year before they finally show symptoms. By this time, the disease may be widespread throughout the body. Non-specific signs which may indicate that Lyme disease is affecting the kidneys include vomiting, lethargy, anorexia (lack of appetite), and weight loss. The kidney form of the disease is less common, but often fatal.
          </p>
        </article>
      </section>
      </section>
      <section class="main-section" id="Bordetella">
       <header><h4>Bordetella</h4></header>
        <article>
          <p>
    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a bacterial infection that is typically part of a complex of respiratory diseases that results in what is commonly known as “kennel cough” in dogs. This is a bit of a misnomer as a dog certainly does not need to be in a kennel situation to be exposed. Infected dogs will demonstrate signs of an upper respiratory infection including a dry hacking cough (some patients will even bring up phlegm or appear to be vomiting), nasal discharge, watery eyes, as well as a decreased appetite and energy level.    
          </p>
        </article>
      </section>
      <section class="main-section" id="Influenza">
        <header><h4>Influenza</h4></header>
        <article>
          <p>
The canine influenza virus causes a variety of signs in dogs ranging from a mild upper respiratory infection (coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, lethargy) to severe disease resulting in high fever, pneumonia and even death.  Additionally, researchers recently discovered that dogs infected with canine influenza virus are at risk for developing residual long-term lung damage.</p>
        </article>
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Failed tests I need help on:
Your #navbar should have exactly one header element within it

You should have the same number of .nav-link and .main-section elements

Each .nav-link should have text that corresponds to the header text of its related section (e.g. if you have a “Hello world” section/header, your #navbar should have a .nav-link which has the text “Hello world”)

Each .nav-link should have an href attribute that links to its corresponding .main-section (e.g. If you click on a .nav-link element that contains the text “Hello world”, the page navigates to a section element with that id)

Hi

Problems I can see:

  • There’s a main-section (“Introduction”) mixed in with the header and navbar code. That main-section needs to be after the navbar.
  • I can’t see a closing navbar tag.
  • There’s no nav-link for the “Introduction” main-section.
  • I don’t know what this is <hive> ?

If you can sort that out, then you should be a bit closer to a working solution.

1 Like

If you change the class of the first section i think you wll be pretty close

1 Like