Can someone please help me check this code on Build a Technical Documentation Page

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I’m working on Responsive Web Design Projects - Build a Technical Documentation Page. When I run my code, it returns value of 80% but it does not indicate the problem. May be I misunderstand some of the questions. Here is the link to my codepen: https://codepen.io/Eaktake/pen/NWWQoZP
Thank you in advance for helping,
Ken

Your code so far

 <main id="main-doc">
  <nav id="nav-bar">
  <header>Responsive Web Design</header>
  <ul>
    <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Introduction">Introduction</a></li>
    <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Media_Query">Media Query</a></li>
    <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Image_Responsive">Image Responsive</a></li>
    <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Retina_Image">Retina Image</a></li>
  <li><a class="nav-link" href="#Typography_Responsive">Typography Responsive</a></li>
  <li><a class="nav-link" href="#credit">Credit</a></li>
  </ul>
</nav>


  <section class="main-section" id="Introduction">
    <header>Introduction</header>
    <article>
      <p>Today, there are many types of devices that can access the web. They range from large desktop computers to small mobile phones. These devices have different screen sizes, resolutions, and processing power. Responsive Web Design is an approach to designing web content that responds to the constraints of different devices. The page structure and CSS rules should be flexible to accommodate these differences. In general, design the page's CSS to your target audience. If you expect most of your traffic to be from mobile users, take a 'mobile-first' approach. Then add conditional rules for larger screen sizes. If your visitors are desktop users, then design for larger screens with conditional rules for smaller sizes. CSS gives you the tools to write different style rules, then apply them depending on the device displaying the page. This section will cover the basic ways to use CSS for Responsive Web Design.</p>
    </article>
   </section>
      
<section class="main-section" id="Media_Query"> 
   <header>Create a Media Query</header>
     <article>
       <p>
    Media Queries are a new technique introduced in CSS3 that change the presentation of content based on different viewport sizes. The viewport is a user's visible area of a web page, and is different depending on the device used to access the site.<br>

Media Queries consist of a media type, and if that media type matches the type of device the document is displayed on, the styles are applied. You can have as many selectors and styles inside your media query as you want.<br>

Here's an example of a media query that returns the content when the device's width is less than or equal to 100px:</p><br>
<div class="boxed">
  @media (max-width: 100px) { /* CSS Rules */ }<br>
       </div><br>
<p>and the following media query returns the content when the device's height is more than or equal to 350px:</p><br>
<div class="boxed">
@media (min-height: 350px) { /* CSS Rules */ }<br>
       </div><br>
<p>Remember, the CSS inside the media query is applied only if the media type matches that of the device being used.
      </p> <br>
    </article>
  </section>
  
<section class="main-section" id="Image_Responsive"> 
   <header>Make an Image Responsive</header>
      <article>
        <p>
        Making images responsive with CSS is actually very simple. Instead of applying an absolute width to an element:</p><br>
<div class="boxed">
img { width: 720px; }
        </div>
  <p>You can use:</p>
<div class="boxed">
img {<br>
  max-width: 100%;<br>
  display: block;<br>
  height: auto;<br>
}
  </div><br>
        <p>
The max-width property of 100% scales the image to fit the width of its container, but the image won't stretch wider than its original width. Setting the display property to block changes the image from an inline element (its default), to a block element on its own line. The height property of auto keeps the original aspect ratio of the image.<br>
          </p>
      </article>
   </section>
  
 <section class="main-section" id="Retina_Image"> 
   <header>Use a Retina Image</header>
      <article>
        <p>
          With the increase of internet connected devices, their sizes and specifications vary, and the displays they use could be different externally and internally. Pixel density is an aspect that could be different on one device from others and this density is known as Pixel Per Inch(PPI) or Dots Per Inch(DPI). The most famous such display is the one known as a "Retina Display" on the latest Apple MacBook Pro notebooks, and recently iMac computers. Due to the difference in pixel density between a "Retina" and "Non-Retina" displays, some images that have not been made with a High-Resolution Display in mind could look "pixelated" when rendered on a High-Resolution display.<br>

The simplest way to make your images properly appear on High-Resolution Displays, such as the MacBook Pros "retina display" is to define their width and height values as only half of what the original file is. Here is an example of an image that is only using half of the original height and width:</p><br>
<div class="boxed">

  img { height: 250px; width: 250px; }<br>

  img src="coolPic500x500" alt="A most excellent picture"
        </div>
        <br>
      </article>
   </section>
  
  <section class="main-section" id="Typography_Responsive"> 
   <header>Make Typography Responsive</header>
      <article>
        <p>
          Instead of using em or px to size text, you can use viewport units for responsive typography. Viewport units, like percentages, are relative units, but they are based off different items. Viewport units are relative to the viewport dimensions (width or height) of a device, and percentages are relative to the size of the parent container element.<br>

The four different viewport units are:</p>
<div class="boxed">
  <ul>
    <li>vw (viewport width): 10vw would be 10% of the viewport's width.</li><br>
    <li>vh (viewport height): 3vh would be 3% of the viewport's height.</li><br>
    <li>vh (viewport height): 50vh would be 50% of the viewport's height.</li><br>
    <li>vmin (viewport minimum): 70vmin would be 70% of the viewport's smaller dimension (height or width).</li><br>
    <li>vmax (viewport maximum): 100vmax would be 100% of the viewport's bigger dimension (height or width).</li>
  </ul>
   </div>
     <p>
       Here is an example that sets a body tag to 30% of the viewport's width.</p>
<div class="boxed">
body { width: 30vw; }
        </div>
        <br>
     </article>
  </section>
  
<section class="main-section" id="credit"> 
   <header>Credit</header>
        <p>All of contents on this page are taken from Free Code Camp Website.  For more information and more free lessons please visit <a href="www.freecodecamp.org">FreeCodeCamp.org</a>.
    </p>
  </section><br>
  <footer>
  <p>Posted by: Eakpoj Opilun</p>
  <p>Contact information: <a href="mailto:Eakpoj@gmail.com">
 Eakpoj@gmail.com</a>.</p>
</footer>
</main>

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Challenge: Build a Technical Documentation Page

Link to the challenge:

Hi! And welcome to the forum :smiley:

Sorry but I can not understand your question. What you mean with it returns a value of 80% ?

Hi Ricardo!
Thank you for taking a look. The 80% I was talking about is when I submit my solution link and hit the submit button, it stop at 80% complete and doesn’t do anything else. It gives me an option to submit and go to next challenge but it doesn’t give me a check mark on the project. Please let me know if I did not explain this clearly, I am kind of new to this forum and coding.
Thanks for helping,
Ken

you do not have the provided test suite in your pen that can check if your cose respect user stories
add that one and check with that before submitting
it is provided in the project page

1 Like

Thank you ieahleen. I will look into that.

Thank you, ieahleen. I found that script for the test suite that you mentioned. Problem solved! I was stuck for almost two days going over my code so many times.