Discouraged - Need Encouragment

Discouraged - Need Encouragment
0

#1

I’ve seen so many great posts by people who literally started coding less than a year ago and are already working as Front End Developers. I’ve been building websites since 2002, more as a designer with HTML and CSS, also using Wordpress and other cms’. I’ve recently started going through courses to make me a qualified front end developer; however I feel a bit discouraged that i’m about 5 months into it, but still haven’t been able to make the quick progress that others seem to make. I’m a mom with 2 kids, so i struggle to get the time to go through the courses quickly. I’ve been applying for jobs with the skills that I have, and unlike others who have gotten jobs just after months of learning on FCC, I’ve gotten a couple of "we’re sorry " letters and silence from the rest.

Any encouragement would be really helpful. I have the following skills

HTML/ CSS / Photoshop / Designing in Photoshop - Expert
Wordpress - Expert User, Beginner Theme / Plugin Developer
Drupal - Expert User, Beginner Theme / Plugin Developer
DNN - Expert User, Intermediate Theme Developer

Javascript - Beginner
PHP - Beginner


#2

It takes a lot of time and work. If your life makes it hard to spend a lot of time and focus on studying, then it’s just going to go slower. Don’t worry about what other people are doing; just focus on making progress at whatever pace is your pace.


#3

Thanks for the advice Ariel


#4

I’m in the same boat. I know my comment isn’t of much help but I wanted to let you know you’re not alone! That’s one of my biggest fears is taking the time out to learn and grow (I do like it so I would learn and grow anyway) and then not be able to find a job. I don’t want the disappointment of that throw me off of what is truly my passion.


#5

I’m right there in the same boat. My story is a bit longer but the short version is I’ve been looking for a LONG while… doing everything right but not getting any further than submitting applications usually, sometimes interviews but always rejection letters - or more often than not… getting ghosted.

Not planning to write my story out- it only depresses me further lol. But here’s a voice that says ‘nope you’re not alone even if it doesn’t feel like it’

So I gotta get back to the FCC hackathon application/site… and job hunting!
Best of luck to you-- and to every other frustrated, discouraged job hunter out there.


#6

I feel you. We all have challenges and there is nothing wrong to take it slow. Ignore the ‘noise’ and focus on the coding itself :slight_smile: Good luck!


#7

Just keep going. Expand your portfolio by working on challenges as well. it takes constant work and getting projects done is key.

Honestly there are not that many 1 year and get a good job posts. Most have been doing it longer but started FCC, others aren’t getting dream jobs, just starting the entry level slog. As a single mom, I took a lot of AND jobs. receptionist and web designer, call center and app creator, secretary and web designer before I got a good developer job. And I still had to prove I could do the work.

Besides portfolio building, really get into reading about the industry. Talking the the talk is so important and honestly I wouldn’t have gotten this far without being able to dive down those rabbit holes in interviews. There will always be ghosting but you can’t always control the reason. (I didnt’ get a job offer after not being able to make a last minute happy hour, for example)

Be confident in what you are worth (low paying jobs are just that, and they will always miserable and good for your career).
Be confident in what you know. (Always apply even if you have only 50% of the skill set asked for, they don’t need all of that anyway, and rest you can learn)
Be confident that you like this work. (Don’t do this for a pay check. Like so many creative jobs, it looks like fun but it only will be if you love this work).


#8

That’s absolutely common. The truth is that it is not easy getting jobs, people that were able to fast track with just FCC are probably exceptions rather than the rule, and chances are FCC isn’t the only thing they did during that span that propelled them to a paying position. The reality is that it probably takes more than just a simple application to get hired in most places. It takes some networking and bureaucracy to grease the wheel for the opportunity.

Most of the electronic applications now will go through some sort of intelligent filter that automatically filters out candidates that don’t fit the hiring criteria, which makes it more difficult for the inexperienced and outsiders, so it is entirely possible that hiring managers never even see certain applications.

Like if you list beginner in any of your skill, you might as well not list them, because chances are it won’t pass the scan, even if it did, the hiring manager won’t evaluate you too kindly on those skills. Use a tool like Jobscan to rework your resume to at least pass the AI filters and give you a chance to be evaluated by an actual human being.

Beyond just improving your portfolio and skills, it’s important to make human connections and promote yourself. If you’re an expert designer, put ui/ux designs on places like dribbble, maybe accompany it with a medium post and get people to see your work. If you’re a coder attend local meetups, coding hangouts and hackathon, any opportunity to present something to real live people. Make connections on LinkedIn and talk to recruiters and keep an eye out for recruiting events. Until actually getting the job, finding a job is your job, so like anything, you have to work for it.

There are also services like TripleByte that will interview you resume blind and then help sell you to clients, but you really do have to know your stuff.


#9

I would like to just say that most people here portray a very rosy or ideal picture of what the industry should be like. Majority of people here are in their honeymoon stage or are new to programming.

The truth is, FCC alone is not going to save you. Real world projects are more complicated with lots of politics, twists, and turns. If you’re not totally committed to improving or learning something new yourself for the rest of your life, especially if you have a family you have to take care of, this is not a career for you. It’s not going to get any easier. For some people, that is perfectly acceptable. Just ask Bill Gates.


#10

you have no idea how many people you’ve already surpassed.
you said you already mastered some skills, and you have no idea how many people here at this forum are total beginners.

keep on pushing is the only way to go. different people have different tasks in their life, different responsibilities and such.

I don’t know about you, the most difficult part about being self taught is that keep coming back to coding AFTER you’ve done your duty as a mom, as an employee, as a husband. Sometimes you don’t have the energy to code 3,4 hours a day. And you forget stuff if you don’t keep on doing it. That’s my experience.

if I were you I won’t give up that easily, I come here and on twitter to express my frustration as well, but the most important part is after you do that, you go back to coding immediately. take your break, reset , and then go back to what you were doing all the time. that’s what I have been doing.


#11

Hi, there.
I can understand your problem.
I do have something for you that will help you.

I’m dropping some links here. I implore you check those links. And watch those videos.

Marie Forleo and Bryce Dalls Howard on Rejection and much more
Marie Forleo and Marketing [ Yes. It’s marketing. Watch it]
Marie Forleo - Finding Right Clients.
MarieForleo - Official website

Have a great day,


#12

Thanks Nicostar. It’s really encouraging knowing i’m not in the struggle on my own!


#13

By the way (off topic)… Saw your profile. I’m also a black female programmer. Would love to connect with others. @kudzaidotnet on insta


#14

Thanks so much Ducky! Really its great to hear about others going through the same things. We’re gonna make it!


#15

So true. Thanks Edvinasurbasius


#16

Great advice Tirjasdyn. Really appreciate it


#17

Will try TripleByte. Hadn’t come across that one yet. Thanks for all the great advice. Really appreciate it.


#18

Hmm… Definitely sure this is the career for me. Thanks for the tips!


#19

Wow thanks Zhouxiang… really means a lot to get this kind of feedback and encouragement!


#20

Check these out. Thanks for sharing! Great insights