Explaination for alt attribute

Explaination for alt attribute
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#1

Tell us what’s happening:

. I’m completely new at this and I’m really confused. Can someone explain to me what an alt attribrute is and how to enter it in?

Your code so far

>


<link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lobster" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<style>
  .red-text {
    color: red;
  }

  h2 {
    font-family: Lobster, Monospace;
  }

  p {
    font-size: 16px;
    font-family: Monospace;
  }
</style>

<h2 class="red-text">CatPhotoApp</h2>

<p class="red-text">Kitty ipsum dolor sit amet, shed everywhere shed everywhere stretching attack your ankles chase the red dot, hairball run catnip eat the grass sniff.</p>
<p class="red-text">Purr jump eat the grass rip the couch scratched sunbathe, shed everywhere rip the couch sleep in the sink fluffy fur catnip scratched.</p>

Your browser information:

Your Browser User Agent is: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/66.0.3359.181 Safari/537.36.

Link to the challenge:


#2

Alternative text

The next attribute we’ll look at is alt. Its value is supposed to be a textual description of the image, for use in situations where the image cannot be seen/displayed. For example, our above code could be modified like so:

<img src="images/dinosaur.jpg"
     alt="The head and torso of a dinosaur skeleton;
          it has a large head with long sharp teeth">

The easiest way to test your alt text is to purposely misspell your filename. If for example our image name was spelled dinosooooor.jpg, the browser wouldn’t display the image, and display the alt text instead