Freedom or Fantasy?

I can really imagine learning to code as a skillset like maybe blacksmithing or carpentry that once upon a time allowed for…freedom. The ability to go and be of service, on your own terms for the most part, and help others. In the case of coding, we get to use complex human pieces such as logic and problem solving, and a creative aspect which combines the right and left brains. I am not known for being a fan of sitting at my computer for long periods of time, or being super patient even when trying to get get a basic CMS working right like squarespace. But keeping this dream in mind, building a skillset that allows me to generate income, help others, build some things on my own, and to be able to do this from anywhere with a laptop and internet so I can enjoy the precious time we are allotted on earth…am I living in fantasy land? :slight_smile:

If you dislike spending all day in front of a computer and you have a low tolerance for frustration, then I think that you would hate life as a professional programmer.

If you have any interest, I do still think that it’s worth learning what you can because we live in an increasingly technical world.

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lol… not necessarily, but think of all the other modern jobs that aren’t IT or CS related where people spend all day in a cube… in front of a computer! :smiley:

weigh the pros and cons.

Speaking of “freedom”… At the beginning of my IT career, I worked as IT Help desk taking call after call…after call… and being metaphorically “chained” to my desk.

There are different levels of “freedom” depending where you work and what type of coding you do, what company you work at, how big are they. A company has a profit motive, and is focused on the deliverables. The right culture, and working environment plays a big part in job satisfaction.

Maybe you can learn to code, work your way to project management so you know how to communicate with staff, but most your day will be spent in meetings, not coding, best of both? lol half joking there :laughing: (no offense to actual project managers)