Front End Developer by Next Summer

Hey guys, I have finished the responsive design course. (I’m still working on my projects but only because I’m trying to make them extra beautiful).
Im nearly finished with the Javascript basics section of the Javascript Algorithms course.
I’m also about 35% through codeacademy’s javascript course (just to be thorough).
And a little over 25% though Colt Steele’s Web Developer Bootcamp on Udemy.

My goal is to have the Javascript section, and the front end library section finished before next summer, along with the udemy course and potentially the codeacademy course if I feel like it’s still beneficial.

I also plan to take a udemy course or two on wordpress/drupal/shopify. And possibly an additional udemy course on React.

I want to be able to apply and get into a front end development position Summer of 2020.

I started late October (around the 20th I think). I work full time. But I’m working hard on this. Do you feel like this is an attainable goal? Or am I bound to slow down significantly in a certain area?

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Hard to say at this point. Outside of coursework, have you built anything yet? The JS section on FCC ends with several projects. How you handle those will be a good indicator of your future success.

I’ve been employed 6 months and I literally have to learn how to do something new every day. And there’s no time to take a course and learn it. Just Google and stack overflow my butt off, write some code, scrap it, try again, scrap it, try again… eventually I get it. That’s the most important skill to foster.

I also got the base of JS on Codecademy, and the course has only gotten bigger and more in-depth, then transitioned to FCC. After the FCC JS projects, good idea to do React here or on Codecademy (I did codecademy, FCC didn’t have React back then), and build some projects with it to get a good understanding of it. I would recommend 5-10 personal projects or rebuilding the stuff from the JS projects section using React.

After 5-10 React projects, should be a good enough understanding of it to try the FCC back-end stuff. Build those projects, copy some designs from other websites so they look nice, and add the full-stack stuff to a portfolio website. Get feeedback on your resume (recommend posting it here), jazz up your LinkedIn (treat it like SEO work), and start applying and writing cover letters.

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I’ve only just started my responsive projects.
In college I built a site with html, php, and actionacript 3 (very similar to javascript) where you could make an account, log in, you had an avatar, you could customize it, earn coins playing games that I built in AS3 (I had a pong game and a catch the dropping items game), and purchase more items to customize your avatar.
The most advanced thing I ever built was an AS3 game that was pong meets peggle. Where you shoot a ball from a cannon and then it reacts with gravity to break bricks, and then you used a paddle to bounce it back up to hit the ones it didnt get right away.

I started teaching myself javascript when I was offered an interactive design adjunct position that utilized javascript. Since then I’ve helped students build point and click puzzle games, whack a mole, dollmakers, even timeline based rhythm games- all in javascript. One of them did a soccer cleat customization app. So it’s my job to teach them the appropriate amount of code to accomplish this. (It’s not a coding class, its more design focused).

Ive mocked things up in bootstrap. But an older version. Since then I helped a student use a newer version to create a portfolio site but havent used it myself.

At the moment I’m practicing my Responsive CSS/Html5 since I’m a bit out of practice and just building things in codepen while I work on my responsive design projects, and also working on the javascript section :slight_smile:

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Sounds like you’ve got a pretty good base. From my experience, the most difficult/intimidating points were JS algorithms (some took me a couple days of trying and thinking), moving off of codepen, React (and the toolset around it e.g. Router and Redux), and then later using Github (which was really easy to pick up once I started working with other developers).

Front end, working with data is real important, and in a framework. When I work on the front end, I still have to write and handle http requests. So I would make sure that every project you do once you get into a framework (React most popular right now in US), you work with an API.

You might not need to do the back end stuff if you’re exclusively looking for front end work. I’m a full-stack developer though, so I’m not 100% on what will be required of an exclusively front end developer.

As long as you keep building and learning, it’s more or less inevitable. The job search is a beast in its own, but just as conquerable.

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The algorithms are so intimidating Lol It’s one if the reasons I’m doing about 3 courses at once. I’m hoping by the time I get there I’ll feel more comfortable. I almost forgot I also want to get Sass or less under my belt before next summer too. Obviously I dont plan to be a master of any of these things. But I’m hoping for a solid enough foundation to make the career jump.
Once I am front end I plan to improve front end skills while working toward full stack :slight_smile: but maybe when I get to front end I’ll just be happy being a front end master. Who knows. I just want to get there first.

Ive been following job postings and React looked like the most popular framework which was why it was my focus. I’ll make sure once I get there to incorporate it into everything :smiley: thank you for that excellent advice!

I do already have connections to a recruiter, and people in my network who may be able to help me get my foot in the door with a few local businesses. But only if my skills are solid. I have to make sure I’m there before I call on those connections or that door will slam in my face so hard!

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This sounds like you already have a good set of existing skills and experience and projects and FCC can help you get “up to speed” with newer technologies. I recommend continuing with going through JavaScript, and getting brushed up with the CSS/html5 lessons, but then focus on building stuff with React.
If your goal is to get a front-end position, learning that should be enough. Be sure to reference your previous projects as they are the sort of stuff that sets you apart from most other bootcamp grads. If you want to go full stack, integrate back-end challenges and lessons here and there.

I see being “ready to apply” by the summer very possible, if not sensible.

Just be sure to focus on getting the projects going, learning what you can at least to be familiar. :slight_smile:

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Thank you! I wanted to make sure I was setting a realistic goal.
I was also hoping my design background would help set me apart. I’ve worked the past 8 years as a technical designer. Which means I’m the expert where I work when it comes to not just creating designs but making sure it’s exported properly and using the proper technical settings (including images, video, and audio) , or creating batch processes. I prep nearly all the assets that go to our programs and on top of that I have done design, animation, illustration, and video editing and audio design.
I’m not thinking they’ll hire me to do it all, but I was hoping they would see it as an asset to have a program with a strong background in design.

I’ll start getting some major projects going after I finish catching up on javascript/ html5/css3 and get some react basics down. I’m really excited to see what all I can build!

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its not about just time and course complete thing. You must have to understand algo of JavaScript so you can easily understand React.js :atom_symbol:. So, I recommend first understand algorithms of JavaScript very well then only go :footprints: for React. Don’t worry about time just capture algo. Have a question check this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sppSnBQVt0k

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Hi @Jessicajoy :wave:

Sounds like you’re doing really well at the moment :clap:

Just from my experience I would be careful not to take too many courses at the same time. I’ve tried that a few times and while it seems to be going well to start with – especially when you’re covering similar material and get different takes on the same topic – I’ve found that after a while I burn-out with none of the courses completed. Then it’s really hard to pick them up again later on, so I often have to start all over from the beginning – which is a real motivation-killer.

Of course, maybe that’s just me :grinning:

There are so many good learning resources out there at the moment (either free or low-cost) it’s really hard not to be tempted – but at the moment I’m just sticking with one until I finish it. I also find it easier to task and time-manage everything with just one resource.

And also, if it were me, I’d probably skip the WordPress/Drupal/Shopfiy courses and spend that time & effort on more JavaScript or React courses. It’s good to have a broad set of skills, but not at the expense of specializing in one or two areas.

Good luck :+1:

Edit: Given your design background, you might want to check out Meng To’s https://designcode.io/ – more courses to tempt you :laughing: Sorry :grinning:

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You go girl!
Learning is cool and im in the same track here. Done my ResDes cert and im swimming in JS part of freecodecamp and JS course from NeTNinja(you should check it out, beginner friendly).
I am taking a little break cause im at finish with my electrical engineering degree and i plan to continue doing front dev in 2020. What i learned from this journey is:you are ready, if you are ok with the fact that you will be constantly learning, there is no way back. The most valuable thing in this field is practical skills.
You gain that from real projects. Networking is the key. Do something in team, like Chingu project.
Apply for internship or something like that. You dont know what you need to learn until you are deep in the water, let me put it that way.
I will start my internship while im at my full time job and it will take time, but i’ll make it. YOU will make it, too.
Stay focused, go through one or two sources of learning and DO things with that knowledge.
You will be amazed how much you know already!

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Hi @Jessicajoy :wave:

I’m impressed with your effort and drive! I appreciate your enthusiasm and wish you nothing but success :slight_smile:

Keep that attitude/mindset and you’ll undoubtedly go far in your journey!

I would caution you on setting hard goals around employment, especially since you’re going the self taught route. To be clear, this is the path I chose (landed my first dev job in July after some freelance gigs) and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Unfortunately, employers can throw a wrench in your plans to gain employment full time especially if you are changing industries.

I wrote an article about my own journey with some analytics around applications/interviews that may provide some perspective and tips for you.

With that said, I think you’re on the right path. As others have said, focus on building (and completing) projects as having something to show off your skills will prove invaluable. When I was interviewing I found that employers focused on my completed projects more than anything else.

Keep learning, applying your knowledge, and sharpening your skills and I believe you will find yourself employed in no time. When you land your first job we’d love for you to share it with us as well!

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I plan to work very hard on Algorithms :slight_smile:

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Thank you, I guess I just tried to split it because like, some of the things I had a harder time with, and repeating the FCC will just have me memorizing the one problem. And while practice on a real project would be ideal, I think it’s hard to think of projects that use a concept when you are struggling with the concept. But you are right I need to be careful about flooding/overwhelming myself. I have a tendency toward it. I love how linear FCC is.

I had added Wordpress/drupal/shopify because I see them all the time on job postings along with react… But maybe it’s one of those things where the employers throw it in hoping for a unicorn?

And thank you for the link to Meng To’s Design Code! It looks awesome!

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Thank you <3 I’ve taken the advice I’ve gotten very seriously and I’ve just jumped in and started building some very beginner javascript projects (I may have used javascript for html5 projects in adobe animate but I’ve never implemented it directly into html. So I’m starting from the beginning. I’ve actually never used a getelementbyid!

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My only goal is to be ready to apply/search for jobs, not necessarily have one, I know how hard the job search can be. I just want to have a portfolio of projects and feel ready to take on coding challenges. :slight_smile:

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That’s an awesome goal to set and I’m happy to hear you’ve made it attainable. Given my new knowledge about your goals I think it’s doable for sure. Keep up the awesome work and you’ll get there in no time :smiley:

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