Hitting a wall in general with JS

Hitting a wall in general with JS
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#1

Hi guys! I’m sort of hitting a wall with JS. I’ve been using flash cards for terms, watching supplemental content to try and understand things better, and taking(and passing) various logic tests along the way as well. But I seem to get stuck in the classic “My code is broken and I don’t understand” and/or “My code is working and I don’t understand” thought loop.

Maybe part of it is that when the curriculum shifted, I dropped JS to finish up the new HTML/CSS content. I want to be a front end developer eventually so I figured it was important, but maybe I shot myself in the foot when I lost that momentum on JS. Perhaps I should just redo the entire Basic JS section? Is there a more beneficial approach to the curriculum anyone has experienced? Maybe this is more of a philosophical question than a logical question haha.

Cheers!

Stephen


#2

Hi DallasDraws,

I suggest you redo the entire basic JS section. It will also help you refresh/reinforce your JS knowledge.
Use MDN too.


#3

That’s the life of a developer! lol.

But seriously, if you’re understanding logic, then you’re doing well because that’s the hardest part. You just have to

  • read more (other people’s) code
  • throw a bunch of console.log statements to inspect the code
  • run tests of your own in your IDE to test your theories and understanding

I find it’s usually a futile attempt to try to figure out what code is doing just from reading it. There’s much magic between the lines.

It’s easy to believe much isn’t happening when you see a line like this

const res = arr.map(/*...*/).filter(/*...*/)

But there’s so much going on in that simple line, that console statements and debuggers are needed. Even when I troubleshoot other’s code on FCC I copy it all over to my editor and use the tools it has.

My mentality is,

  • let the code tell you what it’s doing, and
  • let the tools do the work, and
  • If I know it exists and can look it up in under 1 minute, there’s no need to memorize it. (thank you google)

#4

well actually interesting topic.
Sometimes accepting that you dont understand something is only option.
the pace the mind works doesnt always be in sync with your input
maybe you are expecting great results with minimum time.
from my experience some things take several months to grasp.


#5

Thanks guys!

I think I will redo the basic JS section for good measure! Abbreviated functions in ES6 are what’s really hanging me up. For a beginner developer, it seems like I should continue writing everything out long format for good practice and sound logic before I start hiding my work with some of these abbreviations.