I've made a mistake

All I can say is watching too many YouTubers and their opinions will kill your moral and determination, now my mind is set on making advanced projects which I’m not capable of at the moment so I’m stuck at the stage of feeling like a failure argh :tired_face:. Not to sound negative just relieving the anxiety and stress.

Hi @Fierceincii !

You have to remember that most you tubers just want clicks and views.

Don’t get me wrong, there are a lot of great content creators that do a lot of good in the developer community.

But most, IMO, just want attention for all of the wrong reasons.
So it is important to just watch the videos of content creators that actually want to teach like Brad Traversey.

I would advise you to start with one idea for a project and then break it up into smaller manageable pieces.
Think through the features of the project and try to tackle one feature at a time.

Hope that helps!

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Thank you very much this really changes my view point of this whole process.

also remember that what a tutorial shows is how to make a project that was already built, it doesn’t show all the trial and error, all the hiccups, all the floundering, the frustration of making something work exactly like you want, and when it doesn’t, adapting to what’s actually possible or in your reach… etc

But they can be useful to learn some aspects of a language, or about specific implementations
Just make sure after that you make your own project using that new thing, so you can learn it too, other than just having seen it once

If you ever get stuck during a project, you can always ask for help.
Or just come to chat, at chat.freecodecamp.org

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Here’s my list of channels that I frequently use, because I know they offer premium content:


For general HTML/CSS/JS courses and JS libraries/frameworks:


For JavaScript (and occasional motivation):


For CSS:


If none of the above channels cover the topic that I want to learn about, I make some more thorough research. The longer the video, the better. I never click on a video that promises to teach you X in Y minutes (except this one LEARN EVERYTHING ABOUT JAVASCRIPT in one minute! Very fast crash course! - YouTube)

Showing the process of writing code in a video or classroom is always artificial. It is scripted and all of the missteps are edited out of the script. Really, video intros can be handy for specific stuff, but nothing beats actually trying to sit down and work on something yourself. And that’s the sort of thing you can always ask questions about when you hit snags and we can help.

What you read/learn/watch/listen to can have an effect on your mind the same what you eat and drink can affect your body.

Eating a lot of junk food is bad for you the same way watching unhelpful videos can leave you dispirited. Watching what you watch (pun not intended) is just as important as watching what you eat.

Eating what your body needs starts with knowing what you body wants. Healthy foods and a balance diet can leave you feeling physically and mentally better.

Getting the most out of what your trying to learn starts with knowing where your skills are at, where you want to get them, and what are the best resources for that. Unlike helpful nutrition labels on the back of most food, knowing what kind of resources are best for you requires some trial and error, or to go back to the food metaphor, it requires some “taste testing”.

So if you don’t like what your watching, and feel like they are too opinionated, or don’t help you achieve your goals. Then don’t watch them anymore. Finding the right resources to learn is just as important as the act of learning itself.

good luck, keep learning, keep building :+1:

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Find a problem, then look for the solution. Don’t look at solutions to problems you don’t have. Or at least try to keep it to a healthy minimum. Otherwise, you will not gain much insight because you are not solving a specific problem. The tutorials just become an excuse to code something you didn’t actually code (writing code is not dictation).