Learn CSS Transforms by Building a Penguin - Step 16

Tell us what’s happening:
Describe your issue in detail here.

Your code so far

<!-- file: index.html -->
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  
  <head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8" />
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="./styles.css" />
    <title>Penguin</title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
  </head>

  <body>
    <div class="left-mountain"></div>
    <div class="penguin"></div>
    <div class="ground"></div>
  </body>
</html>
/* file: styles.css */
body {
  background: linear-gradient(45deg, rgb(118, 201, 255), rgb(247, 255, 222));
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100vh;
  overflow: clip;
}

.left-mountain{
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  background: linear-gradient(rgb(203, 241, 228), rgb(80, 183, 255));
  position: absolute;
  transform: 0deg 44deg;
}

.penguin {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  margin: auto;
  margin-top: 75px;
}

.ground {
  width: 100vw;
  height: 400px;
  background: linear-gradient(90deg, rgb(88, 175, 236), rgb(182, 255, 255));
  z-index: 3;
  position: absolute;
}

Your browser information:

User Agent is: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/105.0.0.0 Safari/537.36

Challenge: Learn CSS Transforms by Building a Penguin - Step 16

Link to the challenge:

Hi, I’ve been trying to solve this one for a while and having the same issue, but it’s actually so simple, you’re missing ur skew:
Mod Edit: SOLUTION REMOVED

It is great that you solved the challenge, but instead of posting your full working solution, it is best to stay focused on answering the original poster’s question(s) and help guide them with hints and suggestions to solve their own issues with the challenge.

We are trying to cut back on the number of spoiler solutions found on the forum and instead focus on helping other campers with their questions and definitely not posting full working solutions.

1 Like

It’s far better to tell people(Show them) what to do… Rather than having people guessing what to do… That’s what is called good mentoring. telling your students how to do it… Instead, of students wasting a lot of time “trying to figure out” what to code…

Telling people what to do and helping them do it is completely different than giving them an answer to copy without understanding.