Realistic goals for starting fresh?

Good morning!

Just signed up after finding this lovely forum and would love to hear your thoughts! :slight_smile:

I am an unemployed nurse, no CS background, and looking to change careers & hoping to make $80k within 2-3 years.

I have 2-5 hours per weekday to devote to learning.

Is this a reasonable goal?

I am very detail oriented, pragmatic, love patterns and logic, but am weak on aesthetic design.

I am in the research phase of what to pursue - thinking front end, and starting with Python, CSS, HTML - does this sound wise?

I do not want to waste time, and I am willing to work hard.

Please feel free to hit me up with any advice, suggestions, questions, etc. Anything is appreciated! Thanks so much!

C

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Python is not available on the front-end. The closest you could get is using Python to power your back-end code, but the front-end is locked down to 3 technologies: JavaScript, HTML, CSS.

There are a multitude of options that can go “on-top” of these 3 core technologies, for example React is a library that focuses on building dynamic user interfaces, resulting in you writing in a JS+HTML “hybrid” format calls jsx.

It’s possible, the amount of time you’ll need to commit might need to increase to “catch up” with other sources of developers. Namely a full time college student could spend anywhere from 24-36 hours a week focusing on similar topics as yourself.

Unlike a student, as a self-learning you’ll have more freedom to choose what sort of things you learn. This is both a pro and a con. The good side is you can stay laser focused on whats relevant and ignore what you deem as irrelevant. The bad is that you could end up focusing on inefficient ways of learning, and have to personally hold yourself accountable about how you go about it.

Spending 5 hours watching a youtube video might not be as effective usage of time as spending 5 hours building a small project around a similar topic while looking up different problems you face and finding solutions. Not all time is spent the same.

My main advice is to analyze how you end up learning and spending your learning time, and focus on improving it as well as actually learning the content. A self-learning has to be a student and a teacher in a sense, as such you want to be effective as both to get the most out of your time.

Good luck, keep learning, keep growing :+1:

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HI @Chaliz !

Welcome to the forum!

Glad to meet you :slight_smile:

My main piece of advice here is to focus on learning the fundamentals really well, building personal projects outside of classes to test and grow your skills and starting building a network of other developers. Building relationships with others developers can help you learn about good companies to work for and you will learn about openings their companies.

Your developer community and network can also teach you about what companies are looking for from junior developer candidates and common application mistakes to avoid.

If you build a good foundational base and get a junior developer job that will mentor and help you grow, then over time you will have a good amount of job experience and the skills to become more desirable in the marketplace. At that point the money stuff will start to work itself out because you will have more to bring to the table.

A lot of developers are not that good at design. Focus on learning the basics of CSS, practice with some personal projects, and get used to reading documentation and implementing designs from a figma mockup.

If you are interested in web development, then HTML, CSS and JavaScript would be the way to go.

Focus on taking your time, having consistency with learning, build a good foundational knowledge and practice patience. Things like learning the necessary skills and landing that first job will take longer then you think. It is important that you are patient and keep learning a little bit each day.

Good luck!

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I suggest to do following before you start your journey

  1. check out different types of jobs available in tech, technologies used, salary etc ( refer to https://remoteok.com/ )

  2. Go through YouTube videos of people who learnt software development and landed their 1st IT job

Once you’re done with the homework; you can choose your career path.

All the very best.

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I am an unemployed nurse, no CS background, and looking to change careers & hoping to make $80k within 2-3 years.

I have 2-5 hours per weekday to devote to learning.

Maybe a little aggressive, maybe not. It depends on time, aptitude, the job market, how well you interview, and luck. But 2-5 hours is a lot so it is definitely possible.

I am very detail oriented, pragmatic, love patterns and logic, but am weak on aesthetic design.

Yeah, you just described a programmer. Most companies of any size will have separate people doing the design work.

I am in the research phase of what to pursue - thinking front end, and starting with Python, CSS, HTML - does this sound wise?

As mentioned, Python doesn’t usually fit on the frontend. I agree that frontend is the safest bet, though, but it’s good to learn a little backend, too. Python is one option for the backend.

FCC has a curriculum - the first 6 certificates of which give the foundation of a MERN stack, a good option for web dev work.

Please feel free to hit me up with any advice, suggestions, questions, etc. Anything is appreciated! Thanks so much!

Learn, learn learn. Once you get to a point that you can build things, start building things. Learn and build things as an excuse to apply what you’ve learned. And build things as an excuse to learn new things. And don’t be afraid to ask questions.

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