Starting in programming!

Starting in programming!
0

#1

Hey there guys.

Just a general question/discussion here really.

I’ve just begun to learn programming seriously in the past few weeks. But some questions have been popping up in my mind.

I’ve always thought of myself as a slow learner. When I get something, it just clicks and I will remember it.

I feel that programming is quite hard to pick up on., in all honesty, and that when I’m doing the projects I have to keep referring online for help and I have to look at other projects to find the relevant code to me so that I can use it, or alter it slightly.

How long did it take for you to see noticable improvement in your coding? Did it take you a while to also remember all the tags, elements and CSS? What helped you in the initial stages?

Cheers!

Jack


#2

For me it did not come naturally. I just graduated with a degree in programming, but at the beginning I was the only one who had no previous experience in my class. It’s not gonna come in the first few weeks…heck it might not even come in the first month or two. If you really want to know programming it’s something you have to be dedicated to! You will have to research, you will have to read books, study, and so forth if you want it. What really helped me is once I learned something I would take that and just experiment to see what it really does, and other ways in can be used. Don’t be afraid to try things out. That’s how you learn, there’s no use going through a course and learning about the material if you’re not going to practice with it, and really trying to understand it. Me personally I spend at least 3 hours a day that I can to work on my programming. I was never the fast learner, but eventually I got there! So if I can then I’m pretty sure anyone can. You just have to have that dedication.

There’s nothing wrong with what your doing now by looking up, and researching, looking at other projects. That’s all part of the learning! If you’re ever unsure about something MDN is a great source you should utilize.


#3

For me i found the best way to remember tags etc was to associate new info with things I already knew. For example, a web page has a <head> and a <body> just like a person has a head and a body. A person has a foot at the end of his body and a <footer> comes juat before the close of the </body> in html .

Do you see what I’m getting at? It’s not always that easy to associate things together but can be a useful technique.

(Oh and I’ve been programming for years and google is still my best friend) :grinning:


#4

I don’t even think you should worry about how long it’s gonna take you to improve. And you should definitely not try to measure your rate of learning with others. There will always be people who learn faster than you and those who learn slower. However if you’re asking for general chit-chat and curiosity then that’s OK.

I’ve been learning for a little bit over a year and half. My code keeps getting better all the time, very slowly and very gradually. If I had to look back and measure it I’d say every month or two (or three) I see a huge leap in my code’s efficiency and modularity. It keeps getting better the more I look at other people’s code and reading best practices articles etc.

Till this day I google things I can’t remember and errors I don’t know or functionalities I don’t know how to implement. I google a lot. But the difference now is I can asses the answers and solutions on the internet and know which ones that suits my style of coding or my specific use case. Also, the more I mature the more I rely on official documentations than on StackOverflow. Although it’s worth mentioning that some documentation are terrible (some argue all documentation is terrible) and they don’t always contain all the answers, especially when you encounter weird bugs.

Keep up your learning and overtime you’ll get better, no matter how long it takes. Remember to have fun with it and do personal fun projects. :slight_smile:


#5

I doubt you’re really a slow learner - people tend to think of themselves in extremes, but in reality we’re almost always average. More likely is that you have incorrect expectations about what learning something new is like. You’re learning a lot more quickly than you think. There’s a lot to take in when you start programming and if you have no background on which to scaffold that information, you’ll have to fill a lot of small holes in your understanding before things really make sense. Keep at it, because once you pass that crucial threshold where things click, you’ll totally skyrocket.


#6

:+1::+1: Same here.

Google and stackoverflow are my best friends. :slight_smile:


#7

You nailed it.

Statistically, there is a big bunch of average people.
And then there are some outliers, who learn quicker and some outliers, who learn slower.
Media only writes about the outliers, who developed FB, Google etc.,
but no one cares about Average Joe.

In the end, it’s all about putting the hours into it and staying persistent.
Professionals are putting 40 hrs per week into it,
so it’s absolutely clear, that someone feels slower,
when (s)he’s only putting 10 hrs per week into it.