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Hello,

I’m trying to clear these requirements. Can someone help guide me on where I should be looking & fixing?

(sorry for the messy code- working on it)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="styles.css">
  <head></head>
  <nav id="navbar">
    <header>Being Informed about Dementia & Alzheimers</header>
    <ul>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#risk_factors">Risk Factors for Dementia</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#what_dementia">What is Dementia?</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#what_alzheimers">What is Alzheimers?</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#treatment_options">Treatment Options</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#signs_types">Warning Signs & other types of Dementia</a>
</li>
 <li><a class="nav-link" href="#references">References</a>
</li></nav>
  <body>
    <main id="main-doc">
      <section class="main-section" id="risk_factors"> 
        <header>Risk Factors for Dementia
        </header><article><p>According to the Alheimer's Society, "Risk factors are aspects of your lifestyle, environment, and genetic background. <em>Risk factors on their own are not causes of a disease.</em> And similarly, having little to no exposure does not protect a person from developing dementia." <a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a></p>


        <ul><span class="poop">Risk Factors You can Control</span><a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a>
          <p/>
          <li>High blood pressure</li>
          <li>Smoking</li> 
          <li>Diabetes (Type 2)</li>
          <li>Obesity</li>
          <li>Lack of physical activity</li>
          <li>Poor Diet</li>
          <li>High alcohol consumption</li>
          <li>Low levels of cognitive engagement</li>
          <li>Depression</li>
          <li>Traumatic brain injury</li>
          <li>Hearing loss</li>
          <li>Social isolation</li>
          <li>Air pollution</li></ul>
<p/><ul><span class="poop">Risk Factors Out of Your Control</span><a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a><p/>
  <li>Age</li>
  <li>Biological Gender</li>
  <li>Genetics</li>
  <p></p>
</article></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="what_dementia">
        <header>What is Dementia?
        </header><p></p><article>According to Alzheimer's Society, after the age of 65, almost 40% of people experience some form of memory loss. Age-associated memory impairment is typical, however, diseases like Alzheimer's disease and other dementias cause rapid and/or substantive decline. A small percentage of people under 60 experience "young onset dementia", so this disease doesnt just affect the elderly. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>

<p/>
Dementia is usually progressive as more brain cells become damaged and eventually die, however, it does not imply that the person has Alzheimer's. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>

<ul><span class="poop">Other types:</span> <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>
<p/>
<li>Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease</li>
<li>Dementia with Lewy bodies</li>
<li>Frontotemporal dementia</li>
<li>Mixed dementia</li>
<li>Vascular dementia (the second most common type)</li><p/><em>(These conditions can have similar and overlapping symptoms.)</em></article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="what_alzheimers">
        <header>What is Alzheimers?
        </header><p><article>According to Alzheimer's Society, Alzheimer's disease has been throughout human history, however, it has only been recently identified (last 100 years), and we have taken steps to treat, cure, and de-stigmatize the disease (last 50-20 years). <a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
<p/>Alzheimer's disease is fatal and affects an individual different - impacting how they think, feel, and act. The disease amounts to 60-80& of dementia diagnoses, and patients are able to live with the disease with treatment; although, no cure is available (yet). <a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</p>
        <ul>Alzheimer's disease is usually described in terms of stages, indicating the severity of the symptoms. The earlier on in the disease that a person gets diagnosed, the higher the chances are for a better quality of life while having the disease.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
<p/>
        <li>Early stage: Symptoms are mild. A person at this stage is fully aware of their condition and only needs minimal assistance, if requested.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>Middle stage: Symptoms start becoming more noticeable. More assistance will be needed to help the person living with Alzheimer's accomplish daily tasks.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>Late stage: Once the person reaches this stage, they will eventually become unable to communicate verbally or look after themselves. Quality of care is important to ensure that the person has quality of life.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>End-of-life: Cognitive decline has progressed to the point where the person needs 24-hour care. The focus shifts to palliative care and comfort to ensure quality of death.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li></article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="treatment_options">
        <header>Treatment Options
        </header><p></p><article>
          There are currently medications that can help treat Alzheimer's disease and/or dementia which include:<ul>
<li>Aricept™ (brand name) or Donepezil (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Reminyl ER™ (brand name) or Galantamine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Exelon™ (brand name) or Rivastigmine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Ebixa® (brand name) or Memantine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li></ul>
Non-pharmacological treatments are considered "Alternative treatments". Here are some examples of alternative treatments: <a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5] </a><ul>
<li>Aromatherapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Coconut oil<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Massage therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Medicinal cannabis<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Music therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Pet therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Being physically active<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Being socially active<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Challenging your brain<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Eating healthily<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Making conscious and safe choices<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Managing stress<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
</ul>

<p/></article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="signs_types">
        <header>Warning Signs & other types of Dementia
        </header><p></p><article>
          <ol>
<li>Memory loss that affects day-to-day abilities<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Difficulty performing familiar tasks<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Problems with language<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Disorientation to time and place<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Impaired judgment<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Problems with abstract thinking<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Misplacing things<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Changes in mood and behaviour<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Changes in personality<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Loss of initiative<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
</ol>
<p></p>
<ul><span class="poop">Other Types of Dementia:</span>
  <li>Young onset dementia: experiencing symptoms prior to age 65 <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a></li>
  <li>Vascular dementia: brain's blood supply bocked or damaged - causing brain cells to be deprived of oxygen and die <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li>
<li>Lewy body dementia: caused by abnormal 'Lewy bodies' deposits of protein called alpha-synuclein inside of the brain's nerve cells (shares similarities with Parkinson's diseas) <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
<li>Frontotemporal dementia: umbrella term for group of rare disorders that primary affect areas of the brain associated with personality and behavior <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li><li>Mixed dementia: this term is used when someone has more than one type of dementia. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li><li>LATE-NC: Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (or LATE-NC) is the most recently identified form of dementia, noted for its close similarity to Alzheimer’s. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a></li><p/>
</ul> 
<ul><span class="poop">Rare Types of Dementia</span>
<li>Corticobasal syndrome: rare progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes parts of a person’s brain to change over time. As a result of these changes, people living with CBS can experience increased difficulty with their coordination, movement, thinking and speech. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: rare and fatal form of dementia, caused by abnormal prion proteins that are toxic to the brain. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Huntington disease: an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to die. People are born with the gene that causes HD, but symptoms don’t usually appear until mid-adulthood. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Multiple sclerosis</li>
<li>Niemann-Pick disease type C: very rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease that results from an abnormal processing in body tissues of fatty substances (lipids), particularly cholesterol. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Normal pressure hydrocephalus: rare neurological condition that is caused by an accumulation of an excess amount of cerebrospinal fluid in chambers of the brain, causing brain tissue to become damaged or destroyed. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Parkinson’s disease: progressive neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects the parts of the brain that control movement, resulting in tremors, stiffness, and slowness. Some people living with Parkinson's may also develop dementia in the later stages of the disease. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Posterior cortical atrophy: rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes damage and deterioration to the back, or posterior, region of the brain. That area of the brain is responsible for processing what and how we see. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Progressive supranuclear palsy: rare progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes vision difficulties and loss of balance while walking. It is due to an abnormal accumulation of a protein called tau, causing parts of the brain to deteriorate over time. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a severe thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Parts of the brain may be damaged as a result of this deficiency, causing increased difficulty with memory, movement, vision and coordination. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
</ul>
</article><p/><p/></section>
  <section class="main-section" id="references">
        <header>References
        </header><p>
          <ul>
<li id="ref1"><span class="ref-link" >[1]</span> “Risk Factors for Dementia.” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-prevent-dementia/risk-factors-dementia</li> 
<li id="ref2"><span class="ref-link" >[2]</span> "What is dementia?” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/what-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref3"><span class="ref-link" >[3]</span> “What Is Alzheimer's Disease?” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/what-alzheimers-disease </li>
<li id="ref4"><span class="ref-link" >[4]</span> “Medications approved to treat Alzheimer's disease” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-treat-dementia/medications-approved-treat-alzheimers-disease</li>
<li id="ref5"><span class="ref-link" >[5]</span> “Alternative treatments for dementia” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-treat-dementia/alternative-treatments-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref6">[6] “The 10 warning signs of dementia" Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/do-i-have-dementia/10-warning-signs-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref7">[7] “Other types of dementia
" Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/other-types-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref8">[8] “Rare types of dementia" Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/other-types-dementia/rare-types-dementia
</li>

            </ul>
        </p>
<p></p></section>
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Challenge: Technical Documentation Page - Build a Technical Documentation Page

Link to the challenge:

try to fix all the broken html like in the code above where you typed <p/> instead of </p> twice

Also add some <code></code> elements as requested.

1 Like

THANK YOU FOR THIS! However, now I’m stuck with this requisite.

Instead of short-hand naming, I changed it up to have the full name (e.g. “what_dementia” to “what_is_dementia”). Lol what am I missing?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="styles.css">
  <head></head>
  <nav id="navbar">
    <header>Being Informed about Dementia & Alzheimers</header>
    <ul>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#risk_factors_for_dementia">Risk Factors for Dementia</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#what_is_dementia">What is Dementia?</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#what_is_alzheimers">What is Alzheimers?</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#treatment_options">Treatment Options</a>
</li>
      <li><a class="nav-link" href="#warning_signs_and_other_types_of_dementia">Warning Signs and other types of Dementia</a>
</li>
 <li><a class="nav-link" href="#references">References</a>
</li></nav>
  <body>
    <main id="main-doc">
      <section class="main-section" id="risk_factors_for_dementia"> 
        <header>Risk Factors for Dementia
        </header><article><p>According to the Alheimer's Society, "Risk factors are aspects of your lifestyle, environment, and genetic background. <em>Risk factors on their own are not causes of a disease.</em> And similarly, having little to no exposure does not protect a person from developing dementia." <a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a></p>


        <ul><span class="poop">Risk Factors You can Control</span><a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a>
          <p></p>
          <li>High blood pressure</li>
          <li>Smoking</li> 
          <li>Diabetes (Type 2)</li>
          <li>Obesity</li>
          <li>Lack of physical activity</li>
          <li>Poor Diet</li>
          <li>High alcohol consumption</li>
          <li>Low levels of cognitive engagement</li>
          <li>Depression</li>
          <li>Traumatic brain injury</li>
          <li>Hearing loss</li>
          <li>Social isolation</li>
          <li>Air pollution</li></ul>
<p></p><ul><span class="poop">Risk Factors Out of Your Control</span><a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a><p></p>
  <li>Age</li>
  <li>Biological Gender</li>
  <li>Genetics</li>
  <p></p>
</article></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="what_is_dementia">
        <header>What is Dementia?
        </header><p></p><article>According to Alzheimer's Society, after the age of 65, almost 40% of people experience some form of memory loss. Age-associated memory impairment is typical, however, diseases like Alzheimer's disease and other dementias cause rapid and/or substantive decline. A small percentage of people under 60 experience "young onset dementia", so this disease doesnt just affect the elderly. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>
        <p></p>
        <p></p>
Dementia is usually progressive as more brain cells become damaged and eventually die, however, it does not imply that the person has Alzheimer's. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>

<ul><span class="poop">Other types:</span> <a class="ref-link" href=#ref2>[2]</a>
  <p></p><p></p>
<li>Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease</li>
<li>Dementia with Lewy bodies</li>
<li>Frontotemporal dementia</li>
<li>Mixed dementia</li>
<li>Vascular dementia (the second most common type)</li><p></p></ul><code><em>(These conditions can have similar and overlapping symptoms.)</em></code></article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="what_is_alzheimers">
        <header>What is Alzheimers?
        </header><p><article>According to Alzheimer's Society, Alzheimer's disease has been throughout human history, however, it has only been recently identified (last 100 years), and we have taken steps to treat, cure, and de-stigmatize the disease (last 50-20 years). <a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
<p></p>Alzheimer's disease is fatal and affects an individual different - impacting how they think, feel, and act. The disease amounts to 60-80& of dementia diagnoses, and patients are able to live with the disease with treatment; although, no cure is available (yet). <a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</p>
<code>Alzheimer's disease is usually described in terms of stages, indicating the severity of the symptoms. The earlier on in the disease that a person gets diagnosed, the higher the chances are for a better quality of life while having the disease.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a></code>
        <ul>
<p></p>
        <li>Early stage: Symptoms are mild. A person at this stage is fully aware of their condition and only needs minimal assistance, if requested.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>Middle stage: Symptoms start becoming more noticeable. More assistance will be needed to help the person living with Alzheimer's accomplish daily tasks.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>Late stage: Once the person reaches this stage, they will eventually become unable to communicate verbally or look after themselves. Quality of care is important to ensure that the person has quality of life.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li>
        <li>End-of-life: Cognitive decline has progressed to the point where the person needs 24-hour care. The focus shifts to palliative care and comfort to ensure quality of death.<a class="ref-link" href=#ref3>[3]</a>
</li></article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="treatment_options">
        <header>Treatment Options
        </header><p></p><article>
          <code>There are currently medications that can help treat Alzheimer's disease and/or dementia which include:</code><ul>
<li>Aricept™ (brand name) or Donepezil (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Reminyl ER™ (brand name) or Galantamine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Exelon™ (brand name) or Rivastigmine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li>
<li>Ebixa® (brand name) or Memantine (generic name)<a class="ref-link" href=#ref4>[4]</a>
</li></ul>
Non-pharmacological treatments are considered "Alternative treatments". Here are some examples of alternative treatments: <a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5] </a><ul>
<li>Aromatherapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Coconut oil<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Massage therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Medicinal cannabis<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Music therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Pet therapy<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Being physically active<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Being socially active<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Challenging your brain<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Eating healthily<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Making conscious and safe choices<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
<li>Managing stress<a class="ref-link" href=#ref5>[5]</a>
</li>
</ul>

        <p></p>
        </article>
<p></p></section>
      <section class="main-section" id="warning_signs_and_other_types_of_dementia">
        <header>Warning Signs and other types of Dementia
        </header><p></p><article>
          <code>10 Warning Signs</code><ol>
<li>Memory loss that affects day-to-day abilities<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Difficulty performing familiar tasks<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Problems with language<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Disorientation to time and place<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Impaired judgment<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Problems with abstract thinking<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Misplacing things<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Changes in mood and behaviour<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Changes in personality<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
<li>Loss of initiative<a class="ref-link" href=#ref6>[6]</a>
</li>
</ol>
<p></p>
<ul><span class="poop">Other Types of Dementia:</span>
  <li>Young onset dementia: experiencing symptoms prior to age 65 <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a></li>
  <li>Vascular dementia: brain's blood supply bocked or damaged - causing brain cells to be deprived of oxygen and die <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li>
<li>Lewy body dementia: caused by abnormal 'Lewy bodies' deposits of protein called alpha-synuclein inside of the brain's nerve cells (shares similarities with Parkinson's diseas) <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
<li>Frontotemporal dementia: umbrella term for group of rare disorders that primary affect areas of the brain associated with personality and behavior <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li><li>Mixed dementia: this term is used when someone has more than one type of dementia. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a>
</li><li>LATE-NC: Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (or LATE-NC) is the most recently identified form of dementia, noted for its close similarity to Alzheimer’s. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref7>[7]</a></li><p></p>
</ul> 
<ul><span class="poop">Rare Types of Dementia</span>
<li>Corticobasal syndrome: rare progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes parts of a person’s brain to change over time. As a result of these changes, people living with CBS can experience increased difficulty with their coordination, movement, thinking and speech. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: rare and fatal form of dementia, caused by abnormal prion proteins that are toxic to the brain. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Huntington disease: an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to die. People are born with the gene that causes HD, but symptoms don’t usually appear until mid-adulthood. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Multiple sclerosis</li>
<li>Niemann-Pick disease type C: very rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease that results from an abnormal processing in body tissues of fatty substances (lipids), particularly cholesterol. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Normal pressure hydrocephalus: rare neurological condition that is caused by an accumulation of an excess amount of cerebrospinal fluid in chambers of the brain, causing brain tissue to become damaged or destroyed. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Parkinson’s disease: progressive neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects the parts of the brain that control movement, resulting in tremors, stiffness, and slowness. Some people living with Parkinson's may also develop dementia in the later stages of the disease. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Posterior cortical atrophy: rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes damage and deterioration to the back, or posterior, region of the brain. That area of the brain is responsible for processing what and how we see. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Progressive supranuclear palsy: rare progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes vision difficulties and loss of balance while walking. It is due to an abnormal accumulation of a protein called tau, causing parts of the brain to deteriorate over time. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
<li>Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a severe thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Parts of the brain may be damaged as a result of this deficiency, causing increased difficulty with memory, movement, vision and coordination. <a class="ref-link" href=#ref8>[8]</a>
</li>
</ul>
        </article><p></p><p></p></section>
  <section class="main-section" id="references">
        <header>References
        </header><p>
          <ul><code>
<li id="ref1"><span class="ref-link" >[1]</span> “Risk Factors for Dementia.” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-prevent-dementia/risk-factors-dementia</li> 
<li id="ref2"><span class="ref-link" >[2]</span> "What is dementia?” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/what-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref3"><span class="ref-link" >[3]</span> “What Is Alzheimer's Disease?” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/what-alzheimers-disease </li>
<li id="ref4"><span class="ref-link" >[4]</span> “Medications approved to treat Alzheimer's disease” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-treat-dementia/medications-approved-treat-alzheimers-disease</li>
<li id="ref5"><span class="ref-link" >[5]</span> “Alternative treatments for dementia” Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/how-can-i-treat-dementia/alternative-treatments-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref6">[6] “The 10 warning signs of dementia" Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/do-i-have-dementia/10-warning-signs-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref7">[7] “Other types of dementia
"Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/other-types-dementia
</li>
<li id="ref8">[8] “Rare types of dementia" Alzheimer Society of Canada, https://alzheimer.ca/en/about-dementia/other-types-dementia/rare-types-dementia
</li>
</code>
            </ul>
        </p>
<p></p></section>
    </main>
    </body>
    </html>
.ref-link {font-size:10;}
#navbar li {color:black;border-bottom:1px solid;position:relative;
overflow: hidden;
width:90%;
list-style:none;}

a:link { text-decoration: none; }
a:visited { text-decoration: none; }
a:hover { text-decoration: none; }
a:active { text-decoration: none; }

@media screen and (min-width: 400px) {
  article {
    padding: 1rem 3rem;}}

.mainsection li {display:list-item;
text-align:left;}

.poop {font-weight:bold;font-size:18px;}

header {font-size:20px;}

.main-section ul{background-color:#f0f8ff}
.main-section ol{background-color:#f0f8ff}
.main-section article{font-weight:lighter;}

#id and header should be in the same case i.e. uppercase or lowercase and write both precisely the same.

1 Like

THANKS! Another issue I found with my code, that prevented the pass, was that there was empty space in between the < header > < /header > (see excerpt example below) and that was causing it to fail for me. THANK YOU!

<header>Risk Factors for Dementia
        </header><article><p>According to the Alheimer's Society, "Risk factors are aspects of your lifestyle, environment, and genetic background. <em>Risk factors on their own are not causes of a disease.</em> And similarly, having little to no exposure does not protect a person from developing dementia." <a class="ref-link" href=#ref1>[1]</a></p>

No!

<header> Risk Factors for Dementia         <header>

Empty space in HTML content can not cause the error.
Empty space in #id can.

1 Like

Lol but that was one of the last things I cleared in my code, before it was able to pass. The only thing in the ID i changed was the capitalizations as you suggested, but it was still giving me a fail until i cleared out the spaces in the header.

Edit:: oh yeah, i also removed the punctuations like the question mark

Put some space in the header and retest the code and you will get the answer.

ah i see. yes youre right. thank you. that helped clear some things

1 Like