Backend Projects

Backend Projects
0

#1

So after setting up cloudnine and clementine which didn’t work I get this:

Objective: Build a full stack JavaScript app that is functionally similar to this: https://timestamp-ms.herokuapp.com/ and deploy it to Heroku.

so, is there a point in setting up cloudnine?

The error was:
error-parsing-command-line-unknown-option-small-try-mongod-help-for-more-information

which looks like is a universal problem : https://community.c9.io/t/error-parsing-command-line-unknown-option-small-try-mongod-help-for-more-information/5604

Any clarification from FCC folk?

Thanks, FCC is doing great work!


#2

Use this:

until they fix the issue.

It worked fine following those steps and calling it as ./mongod.


#3

I set up everything locally in the end. Installing the ‘heroku tool belt’ on my own system and doing their getting started tutorial really helped me. I found copying their file structure from the example (using ejs for views etc) was a bit more intuitive and lightweight than clementine.js. YMMV

I haven’t used clem for any of the microservices yet, but I’m only half way through them. It might become more relevant after the url shortener (which I’m currently on)?


#4

I created (and later deleted) a Github repository from the Clementine project. In the end I found there was too much code for what the project required.Using the timestamp project as an example: my repository contains a file for the server (the back-end which provides the microservice) and a basic HTML page for the front-end interface to the service.

Link to my timestamp project: https://github.com/SzechuanSage/timestamp

What I aim to do with these projects is to build them on Cloud9 and store the code in Github. That way if someone wants to see what I have done (like a potential employer) then it is easy to do so.

For timestamp and requestHeaderParser this is great. It is not so good for the urlShortener. I miss out on having a full time server running with mongoDB. What I did in that case was to add a “mock database” to the server so the site would run without a connection to mongoDB. So even in this case, someone can download what I have, look at the code, and actually run it.

To sum up, Cloud9 rocks for development (thanks to zaclem01 for the link to get mongoDB working on Cloud9). Clementine is not necessary.

Most importantly: have fun :slight_smile:
(if you are not having fun, you are doing it wrong)