Each nav-link should have an href attribute that links to its corresponding .main-section

Tell us what’s happening:
Describe your issue in detail here.

  **Your code so far**
/* file: index.html */
<nav id="navbar">
<header>Javascript</header>
<ul class="nav-list">
<li class="nav-list-items"><a class="nav-link" href="#Introduction">Introduction</a></li>
<li class="nav-list-items"><a class="nav-link" href="#What_you should_already_know">What you should already know</a></li>
<li class="nav-list-items"><a class="nav-link" href="#JavaScript_and_Java">Javascript and Java</a></li>
<li class="nav-list-items"><a class="nav-link" href="#Hello_World">Hello World</a></li>
<li class="nav-list-items"><a class="nav-link" href="#Variables">Variables</a></li>
</ul>
</nav>
<main id="main-doc">
<section class="main-section" id="Introduction">
<header class="main-header">Introduction</header>
<p>JavaScript (/ˈdʒɑːvəskrɪpt/),[10] often abbreviated JS, is a programming language that is one of the core technologies of the World Wide Web, alongside HTML and CSS.[11]</p>
<code>var a = {}; // create a new object 
a.b = 'hello';</code>
<p>As of 2022, 98% of websites use JavaScript on the client side for webpage behavior,[12]often incorporating third-party libraries.[13] All major web browsers have a dedicated JavaScript engine to execute the code on users' devices.</p>
<li> You can add properties to almost everything</li>
</section>
<section class="main-section" id="what_you should_already_know"><header class="main-header"> What you should already know</header>
<p>JavaScript is a high-level, often just-in-time compiled language that conforms to the ECMAScript standard.[14]</p>
<code>var a = []; // create an array 
a.b = 'hello';</code>
<p> It has dynamic typing, prototype-based object-orientation, and first-class functions. It is multi-paradigm, supporting event-driven, functional, and imperative programming styles. It has application programming interfaces (APIs) for working with text, dates, regular expressions, standard data structures, and the Document Object Model (DOM).</p>
<li>Functions are objects
</li>
</section>
<section class="main-section" id="JavaScript_and_Java_"><header class="main-header"> JavaScript and Java</header><p>The ECMAScript standard does not include any input/output (I/O), such as networking, storage, or graphics facilities.</p>
<code>var a = function() {}; 
a.b = 'hello';</code>
<p> In practice, the web browser or other runtime system provides JavaScript APIs for I/O.</p>
<li>Variable scoping</li>
</section>
<section class="main-section" id="Hello_world" ><header class="main-header"> Hello World</header><p>JavaScript engines were originally used only in web browsers,</p>
<code>function doIfTrue(isTrue, whatToDo)
{
if(isTrue)
  whatToDo();
}
doIfTrue(true, function() {alert('hello');}); //  alerts "world"
doIfTrue(false, function() {alert('world');}); // does nothing</code>
<p>but are now core components of some servers and a variety of applications. The most popular runtime system for this usage is Node.js.</p>
<li>Variables that aren’t explicitly declared can be global</li>
</section>
<section class="main-section" id="Variables"><header class="main-header"> Variables</header><p>Although Java and JavaScript are similar in name, syntax, and respective standard libraries,</p>
<code>var arr = ['a', 'b', 'c']; 
for(var i in arr) { 
alert(i); // 0, 1, 2 
alert(arr[i]); // 'a', 'b', 'c' 
}</code>
<p> the two languages are distinct and differ greatly in design.</p>
<li> Understand how .prototype works</li>
</section>
</main>
<link rel="stylesheet" href="styles.css">
/* file: styles.css */
@media max-width(720px){
  p {
    display: none;
  }
  
}
  **Your browser information:**

User Agent is: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/104.0.0.0 Safari/537.36

Challenge: Technical Documentation Page - Build a Technical Documentation Page

Link to the challenge:

Hello there.

Do you have a question?

If so, please edit your post to include it in the Tell us what’s happening section.

Learning to describe problems is hard, but it is an important part of learning how to code.

Also, the more information you give us, the more likely we are to be able to help.

Remember, ids are case sensitive.