Learn CSS Transforms by Building a Penguin - Step 82

Hi! I’m having problems with step 82 of the penguin project, this is the instruction:

The penguin’s beak and feet share the same color. Create a new custom CSS variable named --penguin-picorna, and replace all relavant property values with it.

And this is the error message:

You should give --penguin-picorna a value of orange, but found ``.

Posting a screenshot so that you can see that the found value is supposedly just a space:

orange

Here’s my CSS code:

:root {
  --penguin-face: white;
  --penguin-picorana: orange; 
  
}

body {
  background: linear-gradient(45deg, rgb(118, 201, 255), rgb(247, 255, 222));
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100vh;
  overflow: clip;
}

.left-mountain {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  background: linear-gradient(rgb(203, 241, 228), rgb(80, 183, 255));
  position: absolute;
  transform: skew(0deg, 44deg);
  z-index: 2;
  margin-top: 100px;
}

.back-mountain {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  background: linear-gradient(rgb(203, 241, 228), rgb(47, 170, 255));
  position: absolute;
  z-index: 1;
  transform: rotate(45deg);
  left: 110px;
  top: 225px;
}

.sun {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background-color: yellow;
  position: absolute;
  border-radius: 50%;
  top: -75px;
  right: -75px;
}

.penguin {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  margin: auto;
  margin-top: 75px;
  z-index: 4;
  position: relative;
}

.penguin * {
  position: absolute;
}

.penguin-head {
  width: 50%;
  height: 45%;
  background: linear-gradient(
    45deg,
    gray,
    rgb(239, 240, 228)
  );
  border-radius: 70% 70% 65% 65%;
  top: 10%;
  left: 25%;
  z-index: 1;
}

.face {
  width: 60%;
  height: 70%;
  background-color: var(--penguin-face);
  border-radius: 70% 70% 60% 60%;
  top: 15%;
}

.face.left {
  left: 5%;
}

.face.right {
  right: 5%;
}

.chin {
  width: 90%;
  height: 70%;
  background-color: var(--penguin-face);
  top: 25%;
  left: 5%;
  border-radius: 70% 70% 100% 100%;
}

.eye {
  width: 15%;
  height: 17%;
  background-color: black;
  top: 45%;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

.eye.left {
  left: 25%;
}

.eye.right {
  right: 25%;
}

.eye-lid {
  width: 150%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: var(--penguin-face);
  top: 25%;
  left: -23%;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

.blush {
  width: 15%;
  height: 10%;
  background-color: pink;
  top: 65%;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

.blush.left {
  left: 15%;
}

.blush.right {
  right: 15%;
}

.beak {
  height: 10%;
  background-color: var(--penguin-picorana);
  border-radius: 50%;
}

.beak.top {
  width: 20%;
  top: 60%;
  left: 40%;
}

.beak.bottom {
  width: 16%;
  top: 65%;
  left: 42%;
}

.shirt {
  font: bold 25px Helvetica, sans-serif;
  top: 165px;
  left: 127.5px;
  z-index: 1;
  color: #6a6969;
}

.shirt div {
  font-weight:  initial;
  top: 22.5px;
  left: 12px;
}

.penguin-body {
  width: 53%;
  height: 45%;
  background: linear-gradient(
    45deg,
    rgb(134, 133, 133) 0%,
    rgb(234, 231, 231) 25%,
    white 67%
  );
  border-radius: 80% 80% 100% 100%;
  top: 40%;
  left: 23.5%;
}

.penguin-body::before {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  width: 50%;
  height: 45%;
  background-color: gray;
  top: 10%;
  left: 25%;
  border-radius: 0% 0% 100% 100%;
  opacity: 70%;
}

.foot {
  width:  15%;
  height: 30%;
  background-color: var(--penguin-picorana);
  top: 85%;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

The way I understand the task, I’m supposed to turn the penguin’s beak and feet orange by adding the --penguin-face variable to the root and by replacing the orange value with the variable. That’s what I did.

When I change the color of --penguin-picorana in the root to blue, for example, the previously orange foot and beak turn blue in the preview. Shouldn’t that mean the variable works? I can’t tell what I’m doing wrong.

Switching browsers (first Chrome, then Firefox) didn’t change anything, btw.

Can anyone help?

did you mean --penguin-picorna?

2 Likes

Omg, I JUST noticed it after posting and I’ve been struggling with this for such a long time. Embarrassing. Sorry for the long post and the unnecessary question!

I think it was the error message that threw me off and didn’t make me think of such a simple problem as a typo. :sweat_smile:

this is actually normal. Whenever we try to explain ourselves to someone, we notice our own mistakes… It happened to me all the time at school, as I would raise my hand to get help then try to explain to the teaching assistant my problem and then — oops sorry I see it now…

1 Like

Yeah, I’ve heard programmers use the rubber duck method for exactly that! I did try to explain it to my laptop. Maybe a duck would have worked better. :smile:

i just heard about this rubber ducky thing last summer when I took CS50x!
it is hilarious but I guess it must work!

Thank you for serving as my rubber duck today!