How to use Git/github/gitbash? | Clueless


#1

Hello all

I’m pretty confused here. I want to start putting code on my github and apparently it’s different from git itself. I downloaded git for windows and it came with something called a gitbash (is it a better version of the windows command line program)? Do I use git bash to version my code (???) and how do I connect it to my actual code sheets and connect that to github.

I am comfortable (I think) with some of the command line commands but I’m unsure how to bridge the gap with all this stuff. Also apparently there’s a way to do version control without the command line so if I could get some information on how to do that it’d be appreciated. I plan on learning the command line extensively but it’s just good to know a faster way and what I need to download to accomplish that.

TLDR: Need all information about github/git/gitbash/version control and how to connect all of them. Don’t need help with actual commands (I think).

Sorry if this seems rambling I don’t really know how to coherently phrase this because I have three new software applications (Github desktop/ Git Bash/ Git shell) on my laptop and I don’t really know what I’m doing with them or if they’re all just parts of the same program.

Thanks all help is appreciated.


#2

You can just use the github website itself. I found the Github desktop app just complicated things.

You can honestly even ‘drag and drop’ your folder of files right into the Github website to update once your repository is made. Then keep your Github folder in the same spot on your computer (like Documents or wherever) and you can update your Github every time you make revisions in your code by going to Github.com, clicking your repository for that project and clicking upload files, then scroll down and click the green ‘Commit’ button.

It’s actually way easier than it seems at first. I know I did the command line first too before I realized that’s needlessly complicated. It’s honestly as simple as drag and drop and clicking commit.


#3

I just learned about Git only around 3 weeks ago so Im new myself here, but I took the course Git and Github on Udacity and it really took me from zero to using it for everything, every day…very comfortable with it now.

I use Gitbash, so will try to explain the parts a bit.

Git in itself is the version control system and it resides locally on your computer…Gitbash is the CLi that you use to type in your commands. You said you dont need help with commands, so yeah, you would type your commands into the CLI to perform all your git tastks. You can use either Gitbash or your system CMD.

Now, Github is a cloud based service for collaboration, so that instead of your versioning only existing locally, you can push it to the cloud where others can pull those changes locally to work on it and push back to the repo online. But its for more than collaboration now though, like i use mine both as a backup, and also for a public view of my code cause potential employers do like to see how much you code and be able to look at it.

Anyway…Github does include git tools online, in that you can make and commit changes to files using the online interface…though I have heard several times over that its much better to work on files locally and push your changes online.

Github also offers a GUI for people who want something that looks nice and so they dont have to learn any commands, just hit a button and the GUI does everything for you…The downside is.there are several cloud based services but Github GUI only works with Github so may be worth looking into one that isnt proprietary for flexibility. I get the gist more people use a GUI than CLI… Git has a GUI too btw, but I never hear of people using it. I personally havnt tried using a GUI, but thats only cause I have no issues with CLI


#4

It’s nice for managing PRs but using Git by CLI for commits and pushes is a more standard way than using the web based editor (don’t get me wrong - it’s convenient for quick changes when you aren’t at your standard development machine).


#5

Udacity offers a free course which will teach you to use Git and GitHub :slight_smile:


#6

I know I did use the CLI at first but it seemed silly when I already had my browser open for testing and such not to just use it. It’s faster and easier.
Don’t get me wrong I love Linux and CLI, but sometimes it’s just faster and easier to use what’s already open in front of you. It doesn’t get much faster or easier than ‘drag and drop’.


#7

In a professional environment they aren’t going to want a bunch of tiny commits, rather you’ll be making one big commit and the CLI is better for that. Obviously I can’t force you to change habits but I think using the CLI version of Git prepares you for a professional environment.


#8

Hello, I have been using github for more than year but still could not understand a lot of things over there and this tutorial really helped me alot, now I feel way more comfortable with git/github.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1h9_cB9mPT8

I hope you will find it as much helpful.


#9

That’s a good point, maybe I should go back to using CLI.
thanks.


#10

just dive into it.
create a repository. (it will guide you)
create a read me file (it will guide you)

give your public repository address here.

invite some people from here. they visit and make some changes. so you learn the basic consept. this is what I did.
here is my hello world repository. you can play with it.


#11

Thanks for the post - I just went thru the same conFlusion.
But I tinkered and got it workin for my purposes anyway.

I like and use the Github Desktop. And Brackets.

I was stuck at a point and didn’t easily find an answer- so’s I’m gonna make this post.
What I do: - and the more advance can tell me where I err.

Go to the Git hub site, log in, and open a new project by hitting the plus sign.

Fillin in the blanks and make a ReadMe with a coupla comments just so’s there’s something there for now.

Go to Your project - still on the GitHub Website
At the GREEN CLONE or DOWNLOAD button
I hit OPEN IN DESKTOP.

You Get a POPUP check “Remember my . . .” and hit Button OPEN IN GITHUB DESKTOP.- - This means the Github Desktop App on your machine.Already setup.

GITHUB DESKTOP , the Gui, not the CLI, opens on your machine.
And lo another pop up doth appear,

With 2 slots for locations - top one is your repo address on the web - leave this as is
and bottom one you can navigate to where you want the local files.

I think this relationship, between these 2 addresses is permanent -you can’t move local directory created after or the Github Desktop wont see changes. Then hit the BLUE Button To accept.

Now any changes in that 2nd local directory get picked up by the Github desktop with those neat before and after stripes. You don’t change anything in the Github Desktop.
Just in the Directory you spec’d locally. Use any editor, just save right back there.

Drop in some jpegs, edit or place an html text or .js file - made with ANY editor
and it shows in the DESKTOP - I like this - damn, I like this a lot.

ONE LITTLE THING - these are local changes only - when you want to beam to the mutherGit- the repo on the web using Github Desktop.

! you need to have done some changes in that “second” local linked directory.

2 You should put in a description in the big white Description box.

AND HERE’S WHAT TOOK ME TWO WEEKS TO FIGURE OUT

3 You need to put SOMETHING in the 1 line box just above description, beside your icon… I didnt even notice it was there. till I squinted.

or the BLUE COMMIT to Master button wont light up, and work.

4 Then Hit - Push to Origin when it appears in the TOP line.

When you now select in GitHub Desktop from the topline menu Repository/ View on Github

The Website opens and you can see your changes and new file adds posted to the repo.

This gives me cloud backup, a version control for my progress and a visual comparison as to what I did and I can still use Brackets, the editor that I like so much.

I’m working on solo projects so your mileage may vary - But this is my first post here and this is all I got.