Professional freelancers, I have a question for you


#1

I am trying for a long time to get my first job in Freelancer.com but it seems that no matter what my bid is or how much time I invest in my profile description - no one chooses me.
I read tips on how to get clients, took the english test and scored above 80%, added projects to my portfolio and changed my profile description.
Here’s my profile -
https://www.freelancer.com/u/NoyP.html
And here’s my github - https://github.com/60noy
I want to get jobs in Web Development (ofc) - my main aim is React. However, I also bid on the traditional html-css-js jobs.

What am I doing wrong?


#2

Why not target local businesses around your area?.. but maybe all they need is a simple website, WordPress, or an ecommerce store.


#3

This is going to sound brutal, but I’ve been in exactly the position you are in at the minute, asking the same questions. I also realise it’s catch-22: you need validation of skills for jobs, you need jobs to get validation of skills.

Anyway, your profile reads as “I have very little experience, this profile is all padding to mask the fact I have no concrete work to show”. Eg, that big list of technologies: generally, if you know any one of them well and had implemented real things for client/s, you would be able to get jobs just doing that. The language used for a profile/resume generally reflects that, stating in concrete terms what was done to help a business make money. Yours doesn’t, it’s some buzzwords + a list of tools that realistically is too long to be true. Look at the profiles of people who get jobs and try to figure out why they get jobs.

It’s also obviously written by a non-native English speaker, there are grammar issues you need to fix.

Note nobody really cares about Github stuff, only mildly important to a small section of people, most of which are not hiring on freelancer.com.

Someone buying on freelancer.com/Upwork/etc is trying to hire someone reliable for the lowest possible price; you are a commodity on those sites. Getting work locally is a better bet and easier way to build up skills; freelancer/Upwork etc are meat markets. You may get success there, but the odds of you making more than agorot in exchange for huge amounts of effort are heavily stacked against you.


#4

Why do you even need freelancer.com if you live in Israel? Your country has a lot of tech jobs and high cost of life. I agree with others that it would be best for you to seek work locally. There is no point in competing with Indians for 3$/hour jobs on freelance sites.


#5

@owel - I tried, they prefer well-known companies to build their websites. They won’t take me, a single person without many projects in the portfolio.
@DanCouper Thanks, I’ll change the profile description. I’ll figure out how to write a good one and learn from other freelancers’ profiles
@prohorova - I am not able to work a full-time job right now so my only option is freelancing. It’s true that in Israel there is a lot of work, but in freelancing many people prefer paying twice the price for a big company to do the project.


#6

I really feel for you, I was in exactly the same position when I was starting out years ago. If you’re going to keep at the freelance marketplace websites, best advice I can give is to amend profile, make bids, see what come back, amend profile, make bids, see what comes back, rinse and repeat, and keep going. It’s extremely disheartening. It takes a while, but if you can get even one or two jobs back, you can hopefully get repeat work from them and then use the rep to expand on that. Pick jobs that pay (this is important, don’t go for “build me a social network, my budget is $50” kinda things), and that you can definitely do, and be detailed and specific (and concise) in the bid proposal - explain how you would fix the buyers issue, don’t be generic.


#7

Thanks, I will. You actually changed my view on how I should approach clients.
I thought that you should be very formal and write long sentences about your skills.
Now I realise that you should ‘speak’ to the client and tell him exactly what you are going to do for him in simple language.


#8

Most profiles on Freelancer use a photo of themselves. Any reason why you don’t?


#9

I prefer not to share my personal images, I saw other freelancers who also do this and they got reviews,
so I guess this isn’t the reason I don’t get any work.


#10

You got the first part 50% correct. You got the second part 100% correct.

Companies don’t prefer well-known companies to build their website because of their name cachet. They prefer people who can do the job well, and have a track record/proof of it.

The fCC portfolio may be good material to get into an interview for a web dev position, but it’s not good material to attract a client, you working as a freelancer.

You need to be showing some real website designs in your portfolio to attract clients. Not some pomodoro, tribute page, or weather app. (As I said, these projects are good for getting an interview, but not for getting your own clients). Then you may ask how can I show a website design if I don’t have clients? You make hypothetical clients! – here’s what I would design for a law firm, a bakery, a small business, a car repair shop, a realtor website, etc etc. Showcase your design chops.

Another option is to do websites for non-profits in your area. Offer your services for free. Some business don’t have a website? Offer to design their site for free, in exchange for some good testimonials for your work. They only pay hosting. Then include their site, and their testimonial in your project portfolio. (Actually, you can make a little money by charging them web hosting + management + backups… host them on your own reseller account, and charge them $25/month. It doesn’t cost you anything, and you’ll make $300/yr for each client).

The board members in non-profits usually have some other job, or know people who know people. Build contacts! If they like the work you did, they may refer you to their own company, or another company.

When you finally get a paying client, ex: working with small businesses, they’re scared seeing PER HOUR rates. Because they don’t know what they’re getting, and what eventually they’ll pay in the end. Bid on their projects on a fixed rate… $xxxx amount to finish everything we agreed upon in the contract. Since you’re just starting out, your estimate may be out of whack. But who cares! You’re just starting out… think of it as real-life education and experience. If you have to, work at a loss just to build up a portfolio and experience from the start.

It’s true that in Israel there is a lot of work, but in freelancing many people prefer paying twice the price for a big company to do the project.

You need to get this BS thinking out of the way. Prove first you can do the work, then you can charge as much (or even more) as these big companies do as a single developer.

You said:

I implement those skills while building websites for my clients, whether it is plain html, css and javascript or Full Stack web apps using ReactJS/React Native with Nodejs servers.

Prove it. Show some real, practical websites that potential clients will get excited about.

Also, most clients don’t really care what you used behind the scenes. Couldn’t care less if you used ES6 or Node or whatever. But they want a beautiful working website, functional, that will attract customers, paying customers, that will help grow their business and make them more money. Show a track record that you can deliver these goals, and you can charge as much as you want.


#11

Are the no part time job opportunities around you?
Also I think it’s easier to get a job on upwork than on freelancer. But I would not recommend you wasting your time on these sites anyway.


#12

Wow, thanks.
I figured out I should really make more real-life projects.
I thought my portfolio was fine because it shows that I know how to use the skills I wrote in my profile, but now I understand that clients don’t really care about my mini projects. Well, it’s entirely new concept than of FCC - to build projects for my portfolio,
Right now I’m working on real-time chat app w/ React + firebase for Overwatch players (I wanted to learn firebase so I could understand what’s all the fuss about it).

After I finish I’ll start making up real life projects ideas and build some websites and mobile apps.
Thanks again, you helped me a great deal and saved me hours of searching for jobs on freelancer.com in vain.


#13

People with a picture of themselves will get more work that those who don’t. But good luck. I hope you prove me wrong some day.


#15

Hello,

Don’t be upset. It takes time to build a good profile on freelancer
It was really hard when I first start working on freelancer
These are the tips you should remind.

  1. Profile Pic should be real
  2. Catchy headline
  3. Good Bio
  4. Your bid should be first
  5. Make common proposal but it doesn’t look spammy and apply fast
  6. Apply for 10 project daily
  7. Budget should be low( not very low)

I will suggest you one more website for freelancing : Approhire.com which is also giving good projects.

Don’t loose hope and try until you succeed.