Should I even start?

Should I even start?
0

#1

Hi everyone,

I’m a newbie, I’ve had basic instructions to html, css and JS before, but that’s about it. I would love to learn programming, but I feel very discouraged. There just seems to be SO much to learn with html and JS already, but it seems to me that in order to get a programming job, the companies expect you to be overall IT genius as well - you know the one that fixes everyone’s computers, be it software or hardware issue, be able to figure out network issues with routers and so on.

So please tell me- if I’m not a natural IT nerd (and trust me, I look up to them, it’s by no means an insult) that lives and breathes everything IT - is there even a point to start? I work and have kids and family, I don’t have unlimited time to learn everything about everything related to computers unfortunately.


#2

What is it that you find interesting about programming? Is your main goal to get a new job, or would you be happy to just learn how to make cool things?


#3

I’m a newbie, I’ve had basic instructions to html, css and JS before, but that’s about it. I would love to learn programming, but I feel very discouraged.

I’ve always been interested in programming. But I’m 48 now, so what’s the point? What finally got me over the edge was a high school friend who recently decided to go to law school. If he can do that, I can do this.

There just seems to be SO much to learn with html and JS already

That’s what makes it an in demand job. If it could be mastered in 3 weeks, it would be a minimum wage job. Consider it an investment.

…it seems to me that in order to get a programming job, the companies expect you to be overall IT genius as well - you know the one that fixes everyone’s computers, be it software or hardware issue, be able to figure out network issues with routers and so on.

It really depends on the job. There probably are jobs where you have to do all that AND fix the copier. But there are also jobs where all they want you to do is build web pages. And even within all that, there specializations. If you check the job boards at Craig’s List, Indeed, Linkedin, Stack Overflow, etc. you’ll find a wide range of jobs. Plus there is freelance work for people that just need a web page.

So please tell me- if I’m not a natural IT nerd (and trust me, I look up to them, it’s by no means an insult) that lives and breathes everything IT

I think that’s kind of a stereotype. Most of those guys are just normal guys that have a special skill set that they’ve learned. It isn’t their life, it’s their job. (Hopefully one they enjoy, but still a job.) And they weren’t born with those skills, they earned them.

I work and have kids and family, I don’t have unlimited time to learn everything about everything related to computers unfortunately.

Well, that makes it tough. That’s a decision you have to make for yourself. Me, I started this and found that it was kind of fun. I think you have to set a goal: 30 minutes a day? An hour? It will take a while obviously. You have to decide for yourself how bad you want it.

Ask yourself: Why do I want to be a programmer? Do I like my current job? Does it make me a good living? How much time am I willing to invest? Am I willing to do it every day for the next two years?

You need to have that conversation with yourself. And your wife.


#4

In the past month, I have gone to the gym with my shorts on backwards, inside out, and backwards-inside out. I am no genius. Please, join us for some programming.


#5

Both really, I would also love to learn how to develop apps, but every app developer I know has recommended I learn Html and Javascript first.


#6

Haha, love this! Thank you :smile:


#7

Thank you for the thorough reply, very helpful :slight_smile:

Part of the problem is I AM the wife, it’s a problem because my husband works nights, sleeps day time and when he wakes up he just eats and goes straight to work. I work from home online, so automatically I am responsible for all the chores, grocery shopping, taking kids places, feeding everyone and of course the constant kid chatter which means it’s not really a “sit down and code quietly” kind of ambiance.

I think most of my IT friends just seem really passionate about computers, they build computers and know everything about everything, it makes me feel like “what chance will I ever even have if all the other people applying for IT jobs are so multi-talented?”.

It’s true that part of why I want to learn programming is the potential future job security. You always read articles about IT field workers being in such high demand and the future demand growing even bigger, yet it always seems like new programmers are having immense difficulties getting their foot through the door, which just confuses me.


#8

I hear you buddy!

I work in consulting and have always been more about talking then any high level technical skills, but recently I started using Excel alot and realised learning technical skills was time well spent.

I was so proud of my tidy workbooks I showed our CTO and he laughed and say why don’t you learn to code? You will get more done and the time will be well spent.

I love my job and I have no plans to become a developer but technology and knowing to code is being such a great skill to have.

I am 30 and thought why bother too, but I have jumped with both feet in and am really enjoying the challenge and the stimulus.

Just do it one exercise at a time and don’t think about becoming a master in a day.

You will be great, give it a go mate!


#9

Part of the problem is I AM the wife, …

Not a problem. :wink:

it’s not really a “sit down and code quietly” kind of ambiance.

Well, life is about making choices. You need to decide if you can carve out a section of time, or sections. Or if you can code with distractions. For me, I need some relative peace and quiet. Talk with your husband and see if he’ll understand that you need to find some time to invest in this potential career.

I think most of my IT friends just seem really passionate about computers, they build computers and know everything about everything, it makes me feel like “what chance will I ever even have if all the other people applying for IT jobs are so multi-talented?”. …

Yeah, but that is a very different job. It’s like the difference between the guy that builds the race car and the guy that drives the race car. The race car driver doesn’t need to know how to clean a fuel injector. He needs to know some basics about and engine, but it won’t help him win the race if he knows how to properly set a timing chain.

You are not an IT person. You don’t have to know how to set a CPI in a motherboard. You don’t have to know what cable you need to set up the network. That is hardware. You are the software person. Heck - an increasing number of these jobs are remote, where you don’t even ever see the hardware. That is a different job. It doesn’t hurt to know that stuff, and there may be a few jobs where it is expected, but I think it’s fewer than you think.

You always read articles about IT field workers being in such high demand and the future demand growing even bigger, yet it always seems like new programmers are having immense difficulties getting their foot through the door, which just confuses me.

Well, if you want to do IT, then fCC isn’t going to get you there. Some of the knowledge would be helpful, but there will be a lot of information that fCC can’t help you with. I also wonder if someone can really learn IT online - there are so many hands on, hardware things.

I think you need to think about what you want and what you can do to try to make it happen.


#10

Hi! I sent you a message…

Marie


#11

@Fuzzymouse

Hello!
Here is an article about a woman who was a flight attendant.
This is the link to Maigen Thomas.
She is a very interesting and enthusiastic person!
If SHE can do it. so can YOU
What is your excuse not to start again?


#12

Wishing you all the best in your journey. I hope you find joy in coding, then you will somehow “make the time”. Jobs and all that stuff come as a natural consequence of your passion. I would advise that you nurture that passion in whatever way works for you. Aroha-nui


#13

Listen, there’s a real need in tech for people with other varied life experiences to get into coding. So maybe you are never a rawk stah

but possibly you come up with an idea that’s actually of value because you have real life experience, and get it to a point you can work with others to help complete it, and you’ve given the world something of value.

Find a problem you and your friends find annoying, and figure out how to automate/fix/digitize it


#14

Honestly, a lot of programming is practice. I wouldn’t worry about it. Just try to code at least for a couple of hours a day.


#15

Thank you all for your replies, you are awesome!! That’s why I love this community so much - so supportive and motivating :sunny:
You are all absolutely right, where there’s a will there’s a way! I should (and I will) make extra time for coding every day.Nothing to lose eh :wink:

Now let’s do this!! :smiley:


#16

Go for it! Plenty of opportunities, and many of them with potential flexibility where the family can benefit.
I am 44, I left my job and I wen all-in into coding…just finished a bootcamp, getting ready for the next 2 years college for an IT diploma.


#17

Hey I know how you feel about the course being a lot. Just take it one challenge at a time. I started about 3 months ago and now I’m doing the advanced web dev projects. Code everyday, follow FCC advice and don’t quit!

From the podcasts I listen to it seems like companies exaggerate what they need from a web developer. In reality there’s a labor shortage so they take what they can.

If you’re stuck deciding should you even do FCC because it might not work exactly how you want to, then I suspect you’re a perfectionist. Google “am I a perfectionist”. I am and it makes decision making more difficult than it needs to be sometimes.


#18

Just think of it as a fun hobby to begin with and see how you go. You could even recruit your kids as creatives and make an activity out of it!

I asked my 7 year old brother to make up a story and find some pictures for it, then I made it into this website story about the banana king and butt butler! He loved it! For the next one (santa battle in space) he even drew the pictures.


#19

Now let’s do this!!

That’s really all there is. Just start! If it helps any, I am a married 30 your old male with a new born. I work about 50hr’s a week with a 45 min drive to and from work. Excuses are always easy to come by. What’s hard is finding the motivation to keep going. With all these things going on in my life I can always find time to code and to learn. Heck, I’m going through trying to learn JS right now and even downloaded a “learn JS” app on my phone and was going thru it at a family cook out this past weekend! There is always time and opportunity to get things done regardless of schedule limitations. You CAN do this!


#20

sorry for the basic answer but Just do it and try. It the only way to know!