Strange thing. Code was added but not by me

Code ( /) was added. That’s a space Then fwd slash. It’s between each Opening “input” & that input’s > character. It repeats 4 xs, since there is 4 input elements.
This is when it showed up. I advanced to Step 18. Then I noticed that fcc did something to my code, ( /), without my involvement. I don’t know the instructions or reasoning for that added code.
If ( /) is supposed to be there, then fcc needs to include it in the Steps. Thanks
Looks like this:

Can you provide a link to the step you are referring ?

here’s the link

An input elements use a self-closing tag (there is no opening and closing tags). It does not affect anything, but self-closing tags typically have a / before the closing >. The curriculum allows you to not add the / because it is still valid syntax, but the way the steps work, is the “ideal” code that “should” have been written gets automatically populated for the next step of a project. The author of the project assumed the user already understands about self-closing tags and included the /.

RandellDawson, I’d like apologize for the demanding tone, in my original post, in the last sentence. I was frustrated. Coding can be that way. I imagine it can be frustrating for a leader, also.
I was sure, not so sure now, that so far fcc, in updated RWD, had only taught me , not for self-closing tags. But I may be wrong about that. (Can’t deny that, at the time, it was difficult to told that I should know that syntax. Since I was sure that it wasn’t covered.)
Right or wrong is irrelevant, to me at this point.
I want to move on & keep learning to code.
I appreciate your help in this detailed, still enjoyable path.

You don’t have to tell us. :wink: But we also need to work with other people.

I was sure, not so sure now, that so far fcc, in updated RWD, had only taught me , not for self-closing tags.

You may be right. FCC wasn’t delivered on stone tablets from the mountain. It is the product of a lot of people that have donated time and energy to build it. But they are humans and humans are not perfect. If you want to check to be absolutely sure, you could then bring it up in the contributors forum on this site. But of course, this is a big project with big plans and lots of priorities, so don’t expect instant adoption of every suggestion.

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kevinSmith, I realize that all levels of experience can have frustration with coding. Next time, if I’m frustrated, I’ll calm down before participating. Nobody wants to deal with someone already upset.

People are not perfect. Yet fcc, has a great concept and learning platform in multiple ways. Tutorials as projects or articles or videos; the forum for answers or for learning-by-helping-others.

I see that editing that bit of code & instruction, is a big project. Hope that most people who may notice same issue, also search & find this thread before asking. I appreciate fcc!!!

It is more likely because the code was formatted using Prettier and React developers are so used to seeing the closing slash that it just ended up like that in all the code.

It is most certainly not considered best practice to include the slash and non of the example code you will find in the HTML specs will have the slash.

Self-closing tags

Self-closing tags (<tag />) do not exist in HTML.\

If a trailing / (slash) character is present in the start tag of an HTML element, HTML parsers ignore that slash character. This is important to remember when an element such as <script> or <ul> does require a closing tag. In this case, adding a trailing slash in the start tag does not close the element.

However, some code formatters add the trailing slash character to the start tags of void elements to make them XHTML-compatible and more readable. For example, some code formatters will convert <input type="text"> to <input type="text" />.


You are also far from the first to ask this question and we have had multiple threads with the same question.

As said, at one point we even had incorrect tests that required the closing slash.