New Learner Advice

New Learner Advice
0

#1

Hi, I’m a recent graduate, I have a BS in Biology and minor in chemistry. I’m coming to a point where I do not want to go to medical school maybe nursing soon. I’m a big fan of the internet I always wondered how all these websites work, and how to maintain them. I’m the type of person that does really good when I am teaching my self, and when I am learning simply because I want to learn. I Learned how to edit videos pretty fast because I have a youtube channel, I make workout videos. I Decided that I want to learn how to code, for my own personal reason, I would even do it professionally when I become really good at it. I just wanted some advice and other resources that I could use to help my learning Process. Any books I should read? Videos I should watch, Habits that I need to pick up. I’m pretty young I’m only 22 years old I think I have some time to learn.


#2

You can’t go wrong with following the curriculum here. I’ve used codecademy personally, but mainly don’t use just one resource, learn to follow standards, document your code, follow syntax, pick up some coding methodologies (how you name your variables/organize your files/code).

Mozilla has a large resources available to the public for free that documents most of the web technologies available: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/

You can also always read through the W3C docs who maintain the standards for the web: www.w3c.org.

Brad Frost is authority when it comes to Atomic Design, when you get around to building larger and well managed design systems.

You should also consider using Bootstrap so you don’t have to worry about design/responsive ness as much. I don’t use it much myself, but it’s a good idea. You need to install it through the command line/terminal. But you can use a GUI (Graphic User Interface) once it’s installed. I recently encountered GitKraken, a fantastic program. I believe there is a book online called Jump Start: Git. That’s a good read on the basic idea of Git and it’s history.

If you’re serious about this, learning git relatively early would be a good idea. Git helps you track changes to files within a directory (folder: aka project) turning it into a repository (project source).

As for habits, you are going to want to be able to doubt ourself, you will either accept this or be forced to learn it when you misspell something, or forget something, or just think about building something wrong. Don’t give up, and build your problem/solving, troubleshooting skills.

It would be good as you learn to think about how you structure your projects. Keeping your files organized will pay off later on.


#3

Thank you so much for your reply, super informational. I will check out all the sources you have provided for me, thank you again.