Software Engineer, Software developer, Web developer, front-back/back-end developer, etc

A lot of people use these terms interchangeably and I’m having a hard time understanding the difference between them. Can any of these terms overlap? For example, can a software engineer also be a web developer? If someone could clear it up for me that would be helpful. Also, an example in the explanation would help me a lot as well. Thanks.

Long ago I used to look for Jobs under Programmer but some companies didn’t use that title. They would use Software Engineer even though there was no “engineering” involved just C programming and testing. If a web development job uses the title software engineer I usually assume that there is actual software development involved but with a web interface.

For Example, to turn Adobe Photoshop from a desktop app into a web app there’s going to be a lot of programming done on servers to provide all the image manipulation but the interface will be HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

Frontend and Backend are just the two halves of Web Development since it is a client-server architecture. Just be aware that a non-technical person will likely be writing the job ad. So go by the technical requirements rather than the title.

Searching for HTML will capture lots of jobs of interest to people on Free Code Camp. Searching PHP or C# .Net will get many Backend or Full-stack jobs since those are server-side languages.

A software engineer develops software. A software developer develops software. A web developer develops software that will be consumed over the internet. A front-end developer develops software that will be consumed over the internet, focussing on the bit the user interacts with in the browser. A back-end developer develops software that will be consumed over the internet, focussing on the bit the user doesn’t see.

All just names for whatever the role has been decided to be called at a company. There aren’t any specific defined job titles that apply everywhere, all just developers or programmers. Last three obviously indicate specific roles (but generally ropes overlap).

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