Junior developer job requirements

Hello,

I hope you are well. I have completed an associates degree in computer science and I did not like how the assignments at my university were given. I felt the assignments were rushed and the learning materials were not sufficient to help students solve the assignments. I am here today on FreeCodeCamp since I feel like I am failing in life, furthermore I need to invest my time and energy into something that can possibly give me the life I want. I have begun to study scientific computing with python and completed 50% of it in 2 weeks. I am not sure if I am too slow or going at a good speed.

Could someone please tell me how many and which courses do I need to complete to qualify as a junior developer and possibly get hired.

Kind regards, much appreciated.

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With regards to this, you should not worry about the pace. Worry about whether you’re understanding what you’re studying, nonetheless, pacing doesn’t matter.

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Hello,

I am understanding without a problem.

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HI @MFJ !

The main question is what type of development are you interested in?

If you are interested in web development, then focusing on the Full stack JavaScript courses would be a better use of your time. That would be the first six certifications.

If you are interested in python and data science, then continuing with the python curriculum would be good. Also the data science curriculum is still being built out so I would suggest also using outside materials for continued learning and practice after freecodecamp.

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Hello,

Thank you for your reply I appreciate it. Truly I am not sure what kind of development i would like to be part in. I am learning and checking things out to see if im into it. So far I understand everything, but I have not decided what kind of development I would like to do.

I would like to have a job that I can do remotely while travelling so maybe knowing my interest will help me choose the development path i want to choose. Can I do front end or back end or other type of development completely remotely?

Kind regards

There are remote jobs for web development.

The company I work for now is fully remote and we have developer all around the world.

But it is important to be aware that some companies are leery of hiring junior developers for remote jobs. As a junior developer, you will need a lot of guidance and mentorship because you won’t have much experience building strong software solutions in a business context or knowing how to effectively work on a team under tight deadlines.

It is important that you have really strong communication skills and will be able to pick things up quickly.

Companies will be willing to take a chance on you if they can see growth potential and there is a longer term payoff.

Hope that helps!

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Hello,

Thank you it truly helps. I wish you and my self all the best❤️

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Hello,

I hope you are well. I have completed an associates degree in computer science and I did not like how the assignments at my university were given. I felt the assignments were rushed and the learning materials were not sufficient to help students solve the assignments. I am here today on FreeCodeCamp since I feel like I am failing in life, furthermore I need to invest my time and energy into something that can possibly give me the life I want. I have begun to study scientific computing with python and completed 50% of it in 2 weeks. I am not sure if I am too slow or going at a good speed. Could someone please tell me how many and which courses do I need to complete to qualify as a junior developer and possibly get hired.

Kind regards, much appreciated.

Only boring lives move in straight lines. I’m on my 4th career and really only succeeded at 2 of them. But that’s life.

I am not sure if I am too slow or going at a good speed.

Don’t worry about speed, worry about quality.

Could someone please tell me how many and which courses do I need to complete to qualify as a junior developer and possibly get hired.

There is no set standard. You might be qualified now, depending on the company. There is no line that you cross and become “qualified”. It is more about increasing the odds. When you start out, your odds of getting a job this month is just about 0. You need to start slowly increasing your odds. Learn and build things. And when you get bored with that, build and learn things. If you keep doing that, and work on your other things (resume, portfolio, interviewing skills, networking, etc.) and are of at least average intelligence and aptitude, you will eventually find something - even if it takes longer than you hope.

What should you learn? Everything you can. The most successful devs I know are the ones that have ravenous appetites for learning new things. They will rarely say, “What’s the minimum I need …” Just learn. Learn to love learning and building things.

You mentioned Python. FCC is really two programs. The first is the first 6 certs, focussed on the basis of a MERN stack for web development. Then there are a few certs with some basic Python. Both are useful but are not necessarily directly related.

What do you want to do?

I am of the opinion that web dev is the easiest way to break into coding, especially without a full degree. I did the first 6 certs, spent another year aggressively learning and building things, and then got a job. #ymmv But a lot will depend on you, your skill, how well your interview, where you live, the job market where you live, how the economy is at that point in time, etc. But the harder and longer you work, the more the odds go up.

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Please do not ask the same question multiple times. I have merged your two threads.

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I apologize, I know now!

Thank you Kevin for your answer,

I was only asking about how long it would take since I would really appreciate working now and its the most thing I want, then I can truly focus on growing without worrying that I am failing in life and that I am behind others of my age. I only want my life to be stable after finding a job so I will be able to devote my time and energy into my career. but now since I do not have a career I feel that I am lost. I hope you understand me. I have read your idea about the more I will learn the more my odds of getting hired will go up and since yesterday your words are in my mind and I’m thinking of them,

Much appreciated.

Kind regards.

Right. But it is imossible to say how long it will take - there are too many unkown factors to make a prediction. Some of those factors are outside your control. Work hard, but be prepared for this possibly taking a few years. There is a chance it could take less, but don’t bet on that.

These are geat jobs so they don’t come easy. If they came easy they would pay very little money.

Hi there!

Based on some of your responses in the threads below, here’s the advice I would give to you.

TL;DR

  • Start building web applications
  • Prioritize projects over completing courses
  • No one can tell you how long this will take. But it could take some time
  • Start applying for jobs now
  • Always be networking
  • You got this! You’re not failing in life :green_heart:

Focus on web

You mentioned that you don’t really care where you start and that you’re not really sure what you’re interested in.

Web would be perfect for you because it’s such a broad field. The skills and tech you use to build web applications will overlap one way or another with pretty much every other field in the industry.

So you can always pivot into something else if you decide building web apps or websites is just not your thing.

In my experience, web also has the lowest barrier to entry. You actually don’t need a ton of schooling or experience to get an entry-level position but there is an element of luck.

Don’t worry too much about time

You mentioned that you’re unsure of whether or not you’re moving too slow or how long is all of this supposed to take?

Everyone else said “don’t worry about it” and I mostly agree but it’s nuanced.

We all have our own unique circumstances that will impact how quickly we can break into the industry with our first job. So it’s extremely difficult for anyone to give you good advice here.

Some people, with no degree, no background, start this self-taught journey and get their first paid gig as a web developer in like 3 months. Which is insane. Most people aren’t going to be able to do that. Some people like myself, it takes more than a few years.

I think it’s helpful to get in the headspace that this could be a long journey still even with your associate’s degree (which is already a good head start by the way).

Projects > Courses

The answer is 0. I don’t know anyone in a hiring position that cares if you completed any courses.

People want to see your work. Focus on building real projects (the freeCodeCamp curriculum has tons if you’re lacking ideas).

You’re going to need to take courses to get yourself started but as soon as possible you should be focused on building your own things and taking what you learn in the courses you follow along with and apply those learnings to your own work.

Completing courses are for you and not really for anyone else. They can help fluff up your LinkedIn which might attract recruiters but without real experience that’s pretty unlikely.

So start building up your portfolio of work as soon as you can.

Start your job hunt now

You never know if you don’t ask. There may already be opportunities out there for you given your current credentials so you might as well cast the net. Get your resume out there and start making connections.

Even if all you get is a ton of empty responses and rejection emails, there’s a chance someone might actually have a conversation with you and that will grow your network.

Network, network, network. Make connections with people. Attend meetups, get active on socials, reach out to the people working at the companies you’re applying to, contribute to open source write technical articles, help people on Stackoverflow or here on freeCodeCamp etc.

Networking is the job hunt. You’re never not looking for work in this industry. Build a network of people who know you, trust you and can vouch for you, and eventually you won’t be the one looking for jobs anymore. Jobs will come looking for you.


Good luck, and you got this!

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Thank you so much, I will memorize your words and use it as guidance in my learning and finding a job journey.

I wish you an amazing day, thank you for your response and help

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The advice above is good - I am not sure where you are based, but 6 months ago I was in a similar position to you and found it easy to get a UK based developer job. I (re)studied JavaScript and AWS, but since getting a job, I have refocussed towards React, as that is what we are using day to day.