My experience getting a developer job

My experience getting a developer job
0.0 0

#1

I guess I will start from the beginning.

I started FreeCodeCamp July 11 2015. I worked in my free time to get done what I could being a stay at home dad. I found my self doing FCC as a stay at home dad because of a personal situation.

So, one day I am browsing the FCC reddit and see an ad for volunteer project managers. I write in a quick applacation and a month or so later hear from Michael and get the PM gig.

From there I am managing projects and working on the balance of my certifications. September 28 2016 I have my 3rd certificate.

After a week I begin looking.

I dont look on Monster, Indeed all the places a gap in employment history will get you tossed out. I go to AngelList and Craigslist.

My strategy is: finding a job is a good, but taking ANY webwork that pays $10/hr or better would be okay and build a portfolio.

I put out 10 resumes. Then bullet pointed my resume and rewrote it mentioning dollar figures of my accomplishments. My resume is 1.3 pages long.

I submitted 10 of them. Of those 10 I had 3 callbacks. One for an RV Shareing service. One for a local candy company. And one from a web development firm.

I interviewed at the web dev firm.

Noteable things about the interview.
*They offered beer and I accepted.
*I moved the conversation away from behavioral interview patterns.
*I used a marketing pitch instead. (I reccomend the book how to sell anything).

The day after I went to a hackathon and won 2nd place overall.

I got the job offer and started in 4 days. October 31 2016.

I work about 9 hours a day and commute 1.5 total most days. I am an hour and a half early every day.

I work hard and continue to learn as much as I can in my off time. I figure in 3 more months I will be reasonably quick.

I started this journey at 30 and I am now 32. I still work on the PM team of FCC and I am 6 months out from getting my hours for my ACP from PMI.

I have the privilege of working with some very talented developers on the non-profit teams. The one thing successful people do in this profession is work hard and stick with it.


#2

Thanks for sharing. I think everyone enjoys reading success stories! Congrats fellow developer!


#3

Great job! I know it’s a lot to pick up coding while watching kids. You are going to go far with your work ethic.