.NET vs Node.js - Productivity & Job market

Hello Everybody!

Little about me: I’m a self-taught developer with focus on javascript technologies like Node.js / React etc. (since 2 years).

The problem with JavaScript technologies is that you have to add many dependencies into your project, each library / framework has their own documentation which is time consuming if you are self-taught. i.e. Moving a project from NoSQL to SQL… you have to add different ORM which have their own docs and you end up rewriting 60% of your backend code and suddenly 3 months just pass…

On top of that, there is a difference in the job market. Me (JS) vs my friend (.net): we both started at the same time. For me in order to apply for junior jobs I have to learn 7 different technologies (typescript, node, webpack…) for my friend it was looking completely different (everything was related to core features of .NET)

The question really is:

  • Is .NET framework so called “battery included” ? or I also need to add hundreds of dependencies i.e. to add authentication with password hashing, jsonwebtokens etc…
  • As .NET requires more code vs Node.js → does it pay off later on during refactoring? Means is it more productive vs any JS framework?

I would be very grateful for Your opinion about it as I’m constantly thinking about leaving the JS world and starting learning .NET even if this will cost me another year.

The questions you’re asking are irrelevant to the job market, which is what you are concerning I assume.

  1. You will have to learn an industry-standard way regardless of stacks, either using an internal or external library. These don’t matter once you get past the learning curve. If you are looking for a full-stack or frontend role, it’s almost guarantee that you will run into node.js.
  2. What do you mean by refactoring? How do you define productiveness? Why does it matter to your job search?

Be really clear on your goal, find the most cost-effective way to achieve it, and put all your effort into it. Everything else is just noise.