Best text editor?

Best text editor?
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#1

I’m looking for advice on which Is the best text editor to use for writing code, I’m currently running a HP elitebook 8470p on windows 10.


#3

Thanks for the advice I’ll do just that and try a few out.


#4

There was poll on the topic in this thread: http://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/what-is-you-perfered-text-editor-an-informal-poll/14072

I personally prefer Sublime Text 3 but Visual Studio Code, Notepad++ and Atom are perfectly good editors and they’re free unlike Sublime, which bothers you with a plea to pay for it if you use the free version.


#6

I’ve been using Notepad++ since I first started coding last year, and I have no complaints about it.


#7

Notepad++ and Sublime are great.


#8

I personally use Dreamweaver CC since it’s part of the Adobe CC subscription.


#9

I’m also a fan of Vim but I suggest Atom, Brackets, or Sublime Text to start with because Vim has a steep learning curve. My personal favorite out of those would be Atom but any of the others would still be a great choice.


#10

Visual Studio Code or Atom.io

if you want a full scale web editor with some extra features Microsoft Webmatrix is free and my personal favorite. Visual Studio is quite decent as well for .Net/Node.js


#12

I started off using Notepad++, then moved to Sublime Text, and then to VS Code. Visual Studio Code really straddles the line between a text editor and an IDE, it has a ton of great features. Two of my favorites are allowing console access from within the code editor, and excellent git integration. It also has some great plugins, and an intuitive manager for those plugins.


#13

A pretty and simple editor for HTML is Pspad here
Highlighted syntax of course, internal HTML browser and HTML checking


#14

For me atom.io have all I need :slight_smile:


#15

Which of those above have live preview? I’m using Brackets because I can’t live without that feature, especially when it comes to CSS. I still find CSS unpredictable (ie: I don’t know it well enough) so it’s nice to see the changes appear immediately without having to save each time.


#16

I’ve dabbled with Sublime and Atom but settled on visual studio code. Nice sleek design, great intelisense and lots of extensions.


#17

I am not really a fan of Chrome based apps like Atom, they are slow.

I did not like Brackets, because it seemed too fancy and some of the features did not work. Over designed.

Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code works nice and strikes a balance between usability and eye candy and but takes too much resources for a text editor (because it is chrome based, sigh.).

If you want to keep it simple just go with Geany. It’s written in C++ and uses GTK for UI.
It is such a good editor, it can handle large text files without breaking a sweat while other much popular editor just give up and freeze (not that you have to handle large text files everyday).

I use Komodo Edit:

  1. Open Source
  2. Nice auto suggestion feature, especially helpful in CSS etc.
  3. Very convenient editing HTML, if you change the opening HTML tag, it changes the ending tag.
  4. Very good auto suggestion for JavaScript.
  5. Actually a very mature editor, it has everything you would expect.

#19

If you want something VIM-like but minus the complexity, try OLDSKOOLED. Like VIM its got 2 modes - editmode and scroll mode. In scroll mode you get Quick-folding. (imagine hitting “2” to fold the second IF-BLOCK on screen)

Open ZIP, GZ, Z and Tar files, even if they’re nested inside other zip files. Search inside them too. Cool eh ?

A minimalist text editor that anyone used to MS-EDIT will feel at ease with.

Download address: http://www.mediafire.com/file/anph19bg54p4okc/oldskooled.zip

Yes… I’m the author.


#20

It’s so subjective that no one can answer that question for you. I’d say the “best” editor is the one you’re comfortable with. One that gets out of your way and let’s you focus on writing code rather than fiddling with the editor. You can try different editors as you work through FCC to see which you prefer.


#21

@P1xt thank you you answered a question hahaha I was not aware of what purpose having a command line at the bottom of my IDE was for.

Cheers
GLT


#22

+1 for Sublime Text. Plus, you can turn on Vim navigation keys and a few ex commands if you enable vintage mode.


#23

I started with Brackets, it’s open source, it has live preview and preporcessor support.


#24

I’ve used Brackets and Sublime Text, mostly sublime text. Brackets was lagging a little for certain things which never happens in sublime text. Could just be my pc, I don’t know. But sublime text it is for me.