Does learning C++ first help me to understand other languages like Python3?

Does learning C++ first help me to understand other languages like Python3?
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#1

I know HTML, CSS and JavaScript If I want to work on Python base Programming areas and also like C++,now if I first start to learn C++ and then Python does it help me to understand Python better,because C++ has deatails coding process.


#2

Hello azmm, I think its depends upon you, means if you want to do a socket programming or OS development, then I will suggest you to do C++, and if you want to deal with other things like web, app development, then directly learn python , its very simple and fast in developing.

Hope it will help you.


#3

Thanks for your
brief and nice reply.


#4

I think you should learn Python before C++. C++ is harder to learn and the syntax is more verbose (as it is lower-level). Python is often one of the first languages people suggest you learn and many universities and other classes seem to be teaching it at the start.


#5

No, C++ won’t help you understand Python better, and conversely, Python won’t really help you understand C++ either—syntactically, anyway. The only thing that the two languages really have in common is that they both follow the OOP (Object-Oriented Programming) methodology. Apart from that, they’re very different from each other in a lot of ways.

What C++ will help you to understand is how the computer and memory works, and how to write programs for faster performance. Those are important things to learn for every programmer. You should definitely learn those eventually, but only after you learn programming fundamentals through Python (or JavaScript, as the case might be).

Incidentally enough though, JavaScript and Python do have some similarities to each other, so learning JavaScript will help you learn Python as well. Strangely enough, Ruby is in the same general wheelhouse as Python and JavaScript as well, so that’s yet another language you could learn if you wanted to. Scala could be another option, as it combines a lot of principles from functional programming but is syntactically somewhat Java-like, which in turn borrows a lot from C/C++.


#6

It will help you understand what kinds of things Python is doing behind the scenes, so it won’t seem like some kind of unfathomable magic.


#7

Thanks for your in details discussion


#8

Thanks, your answer helps me to take decision about learning Python3.