Frustration from a low quality computer science degree

Frustration from a low quality computer science degree
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#1

This is more of a vent post, on what i am feeling from my own comp science degree and my fear graduating from a low quality education.

Its going to be long and i hope to seek advice on my options and how i can improve

i started my comp science major 6 months ago , adding the major on top of my cyber security major which i enrolled.

I have been studying in this school for a year+ now with cyber security as my initial major.

My experience with the school is terrible in terms of the things thought and the quality of the modules given which worries me.

The first thing is that its not a 4 years but a 3 years degree, and anyone who enrolled successfully jumps straight to 2nd year with a local diploma.

So in total there is about only 15 modules needed to graduate for anyone enrolled here. Even though the degree is short , its accredited regionally.

Out of 16 modules thought a few of the modules are needed to be taken in order to graduate such as research, wellbeing etc. So the only relevant modules for a double major is 12.

In total each major has only 4 to 5 core modules.with my comp science only having 5 core modules to take in order to graduate.

This worries me , because every other comp science major ive seen has more relevant modules than mine. And more structured and rigored than my school.

To put it simply , it is bad for its outdated materials and its made easy as compared to what others are getting. I feel i am not getting much for what i am learning from a degree with very basic things thought when i can learn online on my own quickler

As such this is depressing for me , to continue something that is so trash compared to a proper degree with proper education. I feel my hunger for knowledge is not being fulfilled and not getting everything thought in a full comp science curriculum.

I try to make up with it learning things on my own which i have been committed too. But i feel that i lose out to someone who does a proper 4 year comp science degree.

I try to beat the feeling, and perservere in my own way. But i cant help but to feel inferior. To have a trash degree that has a outdated system that is made to help anyone pass.

Transfering school is not an option cuz it means forfeiting a hefty sum. As for why i chose here in the first place , is another long story.

I appologise for my post being whinny, its just frustrating to be part of a for profit education system that i cant do anyhing about.

I am 24 with a year left to graduate, only knowing what i wanted to do 6 months ago. I am doing my best to work on my own so that i can graduate with enough confidence to look for a job


#2

Hi,
Universities have to approve the curriculum ahead of time; therefore, the information is outdated. You earn a degree to show to potential hires that you have heuristic knowledge and you are competent to represent the company; therefore, most of useful technical knowledge in computer science comes from independent studies.
Good luck,
Irina


#3

Tell you what… I’m 50.

Everything that was technologically specific that I learned in college, is now useless and obsolete. Some of them within just a few years of graduating.

But everything that was the basics, and the fundamentals… I carry that with me and will always be with me. And that’s what I use as the foundation when learning something new.

Computer tech/software/libraries/languages — they will come and go. Sometimes within months or a year or two.

If you want to learn the latest fad, learn it on your own. Hopefully, your college education has equipped you to know how to learn new things.

Technology changes at a breakneck speed. You can’t expect colleges to always be teaching the latest fad.


#4

A proper computer science curriculum doesn’t teach technology per se—it teaches theory and concepts that you’ll benefit from using in the real-world, and is timeless. Or in other words, theory and concepts that won’t get outdated next year.

You didn’t say where you’re going to school (or which country for that matter), but the average 4-year CS degree in the US actually covers only 2-3 years of actual computer science topics, if you stripped out all of the topics that aren’t computer science—because in the US, those 4 years usually include courses in other subjects such as natural science, humanities, math, etc. Excluding those courses, the average CS curriculum should only take 2-3 years to complete.

So unless you didn’t take any courses on the essential CS foundations, which are data structures, algorithms, discrete math, operating systems, programming language theory concepts (i.e., topics like abstract syntax trees, lexing/parsing, etc), design patterns, and software engineering principles/methodology, there’s nothing to worry about.


#5

Right, i shouldnt say outdated but lacking. Outdated meaning its not as good as a typical uni that is 4 years. It skips out the maths part for example which is core cs. And certain impt cs portion languages compillers. Anw i was overworried when i wrote this post . Anything is better than nothing


#6

Uni is distance uni from australia. And it skips discrete maths. And theory stuff like programming languages.

So the only modules i have.

Principles of comp sciences
Data struct and algo
Design patterns
Operating system
Ai


#7

Which university out of curiosity?


#8

its from murdoch university


#9

That’s a good base set of topics, and covers most of the CS fundamentals that are useful & practical. For the topics that you didn’t learn, there are online resources that you could probably find. Just doing a quick Google search on resources for discrete math turned up these links:

https://www.quora.com/Where-can-I-find-a-good-discrete-math-course-online

Udemy has a $9.99 (USD) sale going on right now that you could take advantage of to buy any other courses that you might be interested in.

And as for programming language theory, while you’re unlikely to find online courses on the topic, there are three well-known textbooks, any of which you could use:

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs | https://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/sicp/index.html
Essentials of Programming Languages | http://www.eopl3.com/
Concepts of Programming Languages | https://www.pearson.com/us/higher-education/program/Sebesta-Concepts-of-Programming-Languages-11th-Edition/PGM270801.html


As Quick as Possible with Good Understanding of Concepts