Imposter Syndrome


#1

I just wanted to start off by saying that since july 4, I decided to deep dive into web development after having dabbling in it on here since April 6. And managed to finish my portfolio page, random quote machine, weather app, Wikipedia viewer, last 2 basic algorithms and 12 of the intermediate algorithms, codeacademy jquery course and team treehouse Ajax course and understanding the weird parts.

However, I hit a wall where i spent a day not being able to get the data that I want out of twitch.api and another day being confused on how to make the calculator project with vanilla javascript.

And I realized that a lot of times that I use stack overflow after extensive pseudocoding to get what I want accomplished. I don’t always write my own code out on the spot and instead look at other people’s examples when I get stuck. I do implement them in my own way though and try my best to understand it. And I don’t even fully read through documentation first but rather skim.

I’m starting to feel like I am not cut out for this? And I was planning to start applying for internships on august 6. As I was on a trajectory where I expected to finish all of the intermediate stuff. I’m taking a quarter off school in the fall to study web dev fulll time. Since I realized that my degree is impractical and doesn’t have a good job market but am wondering if I made a mistake.


#2

Everyone consults documentation and stackoverflow once in a while during development. You are not expected to know and remember everything.


#3

Just finished my Front-end course yesterday, now I’m giving myself a day off, going around and talking to people.
Reading your case, i think you’re doing just fine. I myself hit the wall way sooner than you. It took me around 3 full days for my portfollio page and a whole week for the “random quote machine”.

Just so you know, I also did what you’re doing. Going to github, stackoverflow, googling when i got stuck over something. Liked you, I started doubting myself also.

But then, everything just clicked. And i somehow manage to complete the advance project in two days each. And the good thing is, for those projects, I managed to figured most stuffs by myself.

So good luck, and keep trying! :smiley:


#4

Keep in mind that people differ from one another, and what one can accomplish in a few minutes, the other can accomplish in a couple of days. The process you’re going through is natural, and I think everyone gets to a certain point and starts asking himself “I’m useless, it’s too tough, should I quit? …” I would suggest that you look back at what you have created so far, at what you have learned … it will keep you moving forward, and discourage you to look back.

As it has previously been mentioned, you are not expected to know everything – that’s impossible anyway. Can you find the pieces of information you need to? If so, great! That’s eventually the skillsets you need. You’re going to learn the things you use on daily basis eventually.

The other day, I was supposed to make an app using C#, which I had never used before. What did I do? I searched for some information on the Internet, and tried to put all the pieces together to make my app work, and I managed it by using Google. The chunk of code I came up with was the bare minimum, but I learned some stuff about the language, it was me who composed all the necessary pieces.

Whatever you do just make sure you’re enjoying it, and don’t ever doubt about your skills! You may not see the results now, but you’ll see them later on.


#5

One thing i think a lot of people forget (myself included) is that being able to search on stack overflow and use what you find to solve your problem is a skill in itself. A lot of people wouldn’t be able to know what to search for and how to apply it. If you can do that then you are definitely on the right track.


#6

Everyone has moments of doubt and a feeling like they don’t belong. It sucks, but you’ll get past it.








#7

One word: “bootstrapping”. What you’re doing right now is bootstrapping your own knowledge. In fact, that’s the essence of self-studying anything worthwhile.