The path toward game development. What steps should I be taking?

Hey all, so the whole reason I started getting into coding is to make games. I don’t have goals as big as leading a dev team, more like making simple but fun mobile games. I currently have learned HTML, CSS, JS and I would say I’m just under intermediate level on those three. I just started learning C# as it is the language used by Unity. Basically I’m looking for advice on where to go from where I’m at to reach where I want to be.

I have made 1 simple game using Kaboom.js and it was very rewarding and a fantastic learning experience and I would definitely like to take it further. Here’s a link if you want to try it out: https://replit.com/@The702Guy/Mr-Gun-Man?v=1

For game development, there are really only two programming languages that matter: C# or C++. While you can technically make games in any language, C# and C++ are the most prevalent by far.

C# is a good choice to start with since Unity is a good engine, and it has a strong ecosystem and community. I’d just recommend picking up a good book (ebook if that’s easier for you) to learn C# first, then learn Unity. I’ve used The C# Player’s Guide to learn some C# and it’s a good book.

3 Likes

Thanks for the reply! I picked up that book, I’ve just started some free online courses in the mean time. Is there any good resources out there for learning unity? I know Unity itself has resources. Also how different is C++ from C#?

Also how different is C++ from C#?

Both (and JavaScript) are based on C, an important low-level language. It’s an over-simplification, but C++ is C with some OOP abilities built in. C++ compiles to machine code, like C. C# is part of the .NET world. It is a higher level language, needs a run time environment, and is more component based rather than OOP. I’ve done a little C++ and almost no C#, but I expect that there are going to be a lot of similar syntax and concepts. I’m sure there are some other differences, but those are the big ones.

astv gave some good advice. The only other advice I’d say is to start making games as soon as you can, even if the first ones suck. Just learn and build.

1 Like

Yup, keep them simple and focused on the topic(s) you want to learn. Forget about polishing your skills, or your games up to some AAA level. As the startup saying goes “never use your best idea first”.

Its a lot of work making games from scratch, even the simplest can suck up a lot of time, which you might of found out learning you first game. (which was pretty fun, but pretty hard lol)

I also wanted to bring up that making games as a “side skill” can be very rewarding and fun, and the core programming skills you learn can be applied to any number of programming use-cases, most of which are easier and less strenuous as a full time game dev ;D

1 Like

I appreciate the feedback everyone. I definitely plan on starting with unity as soon as I get a grasp on C# (which is similar to js so far which is nice) and a new computer. I tried unity a while back but I was so lost with the differences that I definitely want to get an understanding of C# before going after it again.

And yes this is true. I probably spent about 25 hours or so on making this game and thats not including the time that it took for me to finish a couple of tutorials for this software. There were a lot of challenges which made it super fun when I figured out how to fix them. And yeah I made it a little difficult because its only 1 level for now but thanks for trying it out!

I don’t know of any good resources for Unity, sorry.

C# and C++ are basically the same language when it comes down to it. They’re way more similar than they are different. C# just does some things a bit differently, and it’s OOP all the way through (C++ supports OOP but it’s not imposed on you, while it is in C#).

Learning C# will also give you an edge if you ever need to jump over to C++, since the two are very similar.