What is Best way to practice coding on mobile?

What is Best way to practice coding on mobile?
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#1

Hi ! I am working full time and I get very less to work on computer. I have time to use mobile while I am on job.


Develop on tablets/phones?
#2

hi @jhoney91, a fellow camper @kunalgupta05 told me about this app Enki that is really helpful for mobile dev learning. It’s tagline is “A 5 minute daily workout for your dev skills” :smile:


#3

Thank you. I will try this.


#4

Coding on mobile is generally horrible!

A few years ago, when I was learning Python, the iPhone app Pythonista was actually good. They had a custom keyboard that made things like colons and various brackets available on the top row - a much better experience than most coding apps.

I haven’t found a good JS equivalent. I’ve got JSAnywhere on my phone now, but I only used it once to test a simple idea I had about a nested loop - I’d hate to do any serious coding on it :slight_smile:

The best use for my phone for learning to code is to hang out on the forums (on phone right now) - helping people is a great way to cement your learning. Pro tip: create a text-replace shortcut on mobile to easily get triple backticks for posting code blocks in the forum. Whenever I type zxc it suggests the triple backtick - they are a pain to type on iOS.

The other good use of my phone is watching tutorials and reading You Don’t Know JS (available for free on GitHub).


#5

I have cppDroid, an application on my Android. It is great – almost as good as CodeBlocks on my PC.


#6

I had a similar disappointing experience with JS anywhere. I found a better one for iOS called console:log.
Coding on a phone is just not enjoyable, unless you get a small Bluetooth keyboard.
I mostly use console.log to copy code examples from YDKJS books and tweak them to see if I am understanding the concepts. Seems to be lacking ES6 support in the current version however.


#7

You can try fCC’s new (sort-of) partner, SoloLearn.

Personally, I don’t think their curricula are amazing, though they’re fine for learning the basics. What’s more compelling about the app are the challenges, where you pit your skills against opponents answering user-generated quiz questions, and the built in text editor/runtimes for various languages (including “Web”, which functions similarly to the Codepen editor but optimized for mobile).

A word of caution about the editor, though — if your phone closes the app to conserve battery/memory, you’ll lose unsaved changes, so remember to save regularly!


#8

To be brutally honest, trying to code on a mobile phone makes about as much sense as trying to play golf in an elevator.


#9

Why not use your work computer? If you’re allowed to use your mobile at work during work the same should apply to your computer. Personally I think coding on mobile is a terrible idea. As others have mentioned, a “real” computer is infinitely better. If you have no other option though, I highly recommend using a Bluetooth keyboard. Mobile keyboards just don’t cut it. I have one and use it for typing long emails and such.