What Would You Pair with FCC?

So, I just started using FCC within the past week, and I really don’t have any experience with coding. That being said, I’m moving through the course nicely, and I’m currently working on the basic Front-End projects.

I’m extremely eager to learn as much as I can, and I think that FCC has helped me do that as I’m beginning. I’m just wondering if anyone has any feedback about other sources/courses/materials that would pair well with learning at FCC. Like I said, I’m a complete beginner, but I’m eager to learn as much as possible.

I’m looking to coding to potentially be a career path change, if that affects the recommendations.

Thanks all!

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First, welcome to FCC! I started right after Thanksgiving and I’m so glad to have found FCC.

As for other sources I highly recommend the 3 guides prepared by @P1xt … they are really well designed and work really well to supplement FCC’s curriculum. They may also help solidify exactly what type of path you want to set for yourself. Here are the links:

https://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/computer-guide-computer-science-and-web-development-comprehensive-path/64470

https://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/computer-guide-get-job-ready-with-1-fcc-cert-3-projects-2-courses-and-10-books/64027?source_topic_id=64133

https://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/computer-guide-web-development-with-computer-science-foundations-comprehensive-path/64516

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@rytackitt I would recommend Colt Steele’s Web Development Bootcamp course on Udemy. He walks you through a lot of hands on exercises that are great for beginners.

The guides mentioned above form a nice path to follow over a long period. I have to say that the book series You Don’t Know Javascript (YDKJS) is a little advanced for someone that doesn’t have any experince with Javascript or programing in other languages. It’s tough to understand some of code snippets used to explain the concepts. I read the first book and I’m currently working through the second one. I would recommend you read them after you have done some Javascript.

Edit: Sorry forgot to mention that you should look for a discount code for the Udemy course. I paid $19 for it. The codes expire but new ones always pop up. Search this forum for a discounts topic.

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@AgedLace, your second code block did not work, because you had a weird line break in the link. I went ahead and fixed the link for you. :slight_smile:

Also, what everyone said is great. I would like to add a couple too:

http://thenetninja.co.uk/courses

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Thank you @IsaacAbrahamson. Appreciate that very much. I’m checking your resources out as well.

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If you are able and prepared to pay $30 a month, Codeschool has some excellent introductory courses - the JavaScript path is particularly good. After that, at the same price, Pluralsight has high-quality courses on every subject under the sun. They even have courses on individual text editors.

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@arw2015,

Thank you so very much for that info … unfortunately, I’ve been unemployed for over a year now and do not have that kind of money for training right now. That is why I am so very grateful for having found FCC and P1xt’s guides as well as the other free resources people have shared along the way.

That being said, I will keep these resources in mind [and bookmarked] in the event the financial situation changes in the near future.

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Codeschool usually has a few free courses, so worth checking out. There are definitely enough free resources on the web, but it takes a bit of research to hunt down what you need.

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@arw2015,

I agree and have been bookmarking as many as I come across. I have already taken some of the codeschool free classes, as well as some others.

Thank you again for your comments and recommendations. They are greatly appreciated!

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If I had to pick one, this : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Learn

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I am currently going through colt steeve’s bootcamp (https://www.udemy.com/the-web-developer-bootcamp/) and after that will begin with @P1xt’s guide https://forum.freecodecamp.com/t/computer-guide-get-job-ready-with-1-fcc-cert-3-projects-2-courses-and-10-books/64027. They compliment each other pretty well

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I have been sort of keeping pace with the Odin Project
http://www.theodinproject.com
as well as FCC. It’s also free.
It isn’t the exact same thing, no certifications or anything, but the projects look like they would be challenging and they introduce you to the Ruby programming language and the Ruby on Rails framework.
I started with the first basic front end project and quickly realized that I was doing myself no favors by using just codepen. I took my current tribute page, pasted it into a proper HTML file and set it up on my local machine so I can fully understand what is required to make things like bootstrap and jQuery work in your own projects without being behind the scenes. I plan on finishing that first project locally and then sending the changes to codepen for project submissions. I am also not doing any other projects until I finish the algorithm challenges, and then doing the profile project as the last thing so I have done projects to put on it and hopefully get a little better at layout and design… wish there was a free design camp!
Anyway, welcome and best of luck!

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So, it seems like you all really like Colt Steeve. Good to know. Thanks for the replies!

I strongly recommend www.w3schools.com as a complementary resource. It’s my go to for HTML/CSS/javaScript/JQuery/Bootstrap info. It can be used as an ordered tutorial with examples or simply as a reference. It’s a super easy to use website with plenty of code examples and has a clean table of contents.

Also, the Mozilla Developer Network (MDN) is pretty much essential: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web

I’m using Pluralsight based on a friend’s recommendation. They have great course paths (video based). It’s not free though.

I strongly recommend
CS50 - Edx
As “mandatory” for any self thought programmer this days.

If you notice it’s atop in all the 3 wonderful @P1xt guides.

The main reason why I recommend that is because teach you the very basic of CS like sorting algorithms, run-times and the joy of coding in a cryptic compiling language: C.


Despite you like it or not, even as a junior front-end dev you must have some basic knowledge of computer science that very few (if none) of the web-dev courses teach.

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Another nod for Colt Steele’s Web Dev Udemy course. Possibly the single best resource for learning web development, anywhere on the web. It really goes great with FCC.

I would like to thank everyone for their suggestions and comments. Everything is very much appreciated. I’ve already bookmarked both the w3c and the MDN pages.

Thanks so much for the input!

Can you provide github link